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Full text of "Chestnut Burr, 1926"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/chestnutburr1926kent 




£x H&rts 



3% 

PUBLISHED BY 

Senior Classes 

O F 

KENT STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

KENT, OHIO 
1926 








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BY 

IVAN R. STATLER 

AND 

HELEN HAHN 






(toxxtexiit 




o 



THE -COLLEGE 
ATHLETICS 
ORGANIZATIONS 
ACTIVITIES 
ADVERTISERS 




ffiL 







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II 



-ll-ll-IIIIHM'^' 




TO AMBITIOUS YOUTH ENTERING 
COLLEGE, TO JOYOUS, BUSY 
YOUTH IN COLLEGE, TO IDEAL- 
ISTIC, SERIOUS YOUTH LEAVING 
COLLEGE; TO THE SPIRIT OF 
YOUTH EVERYWHERE, WE DEDI- 
CATE THIS BOOK. 




f^tewotb 



WHEN IN THE YEARS TO COME, 
YOU SEEK THE EASY CHAIR, BEFORE 

THE GLOWING COALS, 
THIS BOOK YOU'LL ALSO TAKE, WE HOPE, 
AND FROM ITS PAGES THEN RECALL, 
THE HAPPY TIMES OF YESTERDAY, 
WHICH NOW, UPON THE CAMPUS HERE, 
WE LIVE, AND CALL TO-DAY. 





Kent State 



Kent State College is set on a hill, — 
To win to her door you must climb with a will, 
And Kent State Hill is weariful long, — 
But we trudge on together, a glad-hearted throng, 
Climbing the hill at Kent. 

Kent State portal is open wide; 
You've made the grade and you're safe inside; — 
There's a clarion call to maiden and youth, 
For now is the time you begin, in truth, 
Climbing the hill at Kent. 

For, hills of the earth or hills of the soul, 
It is all the same, for they take their toll, 
One of the body and one of the mind, 
And the summit is hard to gain, we find. 
Climbing the hill at Kent. 

But keep a-stepping, and first you know, 
You are up on top tvhere the cool winds blow, 
Below, farstretched, lies a wonderful view 
And glad are the eyes and the heart of you 
That you cliynbed the hill at Kent. 



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Trustees 





Wm. A. Cluff 



David L. Rockwell, Pres. 





John D. Overholt 



W. M. Coursen 



Page nineteen 





Dauta Cratoforti 221(110 



By the time this appears upon the printed page, the newspapers will 
have printed a few unimportant facts, we shall have given up a helpless 
broken body for Mother Nature to shelter beneath a green blanket and 
a restless spirit will have gone back to the infinite from whence it came. 
And, those who do not think will say— The End. 

It is the end ; but only the end of the beginning — the completion of 
the first phase of that which we call a life. A life is like a seed which 
germinates and through growth speaks out the message of eternal things. 
With tears we ease the pain of sorrow for material loss, the clasp of 
hand, the voice in cheerful greeting, the strength of body in time of need, 
the smile of understanding, the spoken word of wisdom, the act of kind- 
ness, — but the life goes on and on in the development and fulfillment of 
thoughts and plans which had their inception during these few short years 
he spent with us. 

A host of people guided on their way, — 

A world inspired and strengthened by his stay. 

No one has worked harder or to better advantage in the establish- 
ment and organization of this educational institution and no one has given 
of time and energy with greater willingness. The children of our children 
will profit by his having lived and what greater tribute can we give to any 
man than to say to him, — He Served Humanity. -^ g Manchester 

Page twenty 









ifacttftp 



^ 




To Our Faculty 



C~\ NOTHER class has conic and is 
v ~" going on along the Road of Life. 
Going on better prepared for zvhat is to 
conic because of you who. have been our 
standard bearers along the Path of Col- 
lege Years — Our Teachers. Once more 
you have given the best you had to give. 
Once more you have aided, cheered, and 
challenged. Your work has not been for 
just a day, a zveek or a year — it will go 
with us as we journey, always. In com- 
memoration of our joys and friendships 
we give this thought for you: 

You have been not only a teacher, but 
a fellow-traveller of zvhom zve asked the 
way. You pointed ahead — ahead of your- 
selves as well as of us. Working and 
climbing toward this common goal will 
make our lives richer, freer, and happier. 
For all that you have given us, for all 
that you have done, zve thank you. 



« 



Page twenty-two 




oa N-Trur-a/uL Wa^lLoAJ 



President Kenl Stat. N.iraml College, 1926 



Page twenty-three 





John E. McGilvrey, Pd. D. 
President Kent State Normal College, 1912-1926 



Page twenty-four 








Lester S. Ivins 
Ph.B., M.S., M.A. 

Department of 

Agriculture 
Department of 

Extension 

Chairman of 

College Courses 




Stephen Ambrose 

Harbourt 
B.Sc, A.B., A.M. 

Instructor in Extension 




Nina S. Humphrey 
Department of Art 




Ethel Gowans 
B.S., A.M. 

Department of Biology 



Page twenty-five 





Louis A. BuDahn 

Department of 
Commercial Education 




Grace E. BuDahn 

Instructor in 
Commercial Education 



• 




Christian Ferdinand 
Rumold, LL.B., A.B. 

Department of 
Chemistry and Physics 




Paul G. Chandler 
A.B., M.A. 



Page twenty-six 





Lawrence W. Miller 
B.S., A.M. 

Department of 
Home Study 




Daniel W. Pearce 
B.S., A.B., A.M. 

Instructor in Education 




Samuel Herrick 

Layton 

A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 

Education and 

Mathematics 




Henri Boulet, B.S. 
(Faculty of Paris) 

Department of French 



Page twenty-seven 







c£> 







Edgar Packard 
Department of English 




Chester E. Satterfield 
A.B., B.S. 

Instructor in English 




Mona Fletcher 
B.S., M.A. 

Instructor History and 
Social Science 




David Olson 
A.B., M.Sc. 

Department of 
Geography 



Page twenty-eight 





Herman Dewitt Byrne 
A.B., M.A. 

Department of History 
and Social Science 




Eleanor Ann Meyer 
Ph.B., A.M. 

Instructor in History 







Fren Musselman 
A.B., M.A. 

Instructor in Extension 




Bertha Louise Nixson 
B.S. 

Department of 
Home Economics 



P<n/< twenty-nine 





Clinton S.Van Deusen 
M.E. 

Department of 
Mammal Training 




George A. Damann 

Instructor in Manual 
Training 







Ann Maud Shamel 
Department of Music 




Wayne Van Sickle 
Instrumental Music 



Page thirty 





Raymond E. 

Manchester 

A.B., A.M. 

Department of 
Mathematics 
Dean of Men 




Blanche A. Verder 

Dean of Women 
Dept. of Reading 




Margaret Dunbar 
B.L., B.L.S. 

Department of 
Library Science 




Isabelle Dunbar 
Assist a » t Librarian 



Page thirty-one 




Mable Thurston 
Assistant Librarian 




Doris Cauffield, B.S. 
High School Critic 







1 ^W^t W®*^' mm 

Mable Laird 
Registrar 








Helen Bonsall 
Sec'?/ £o President 

Page thirty-two 












John B. Gillespie Jr. 
Business Manager 




Alex White 
Plant Superintendent 




Adelaide King 
Ass't Treasurer 




Mary Lois Trefethen 
Dietician 



Page thirty-three 




Ct)arle0 iFreDertcft I&oei)ler 

Principal of the High School Training Department 

On the registration day of our last summer term, 
Professor Koehler, apparently in the best of health, was 
present, and registered more students in his classes than 
any other instructor ; and yet before the term had gotten 
well under way he had been called to his great reward. 
He was born in Strasburg, Ohio, sixty-nine years ago. 
He was educated at Wooster, and had taught in Baldwin 
Wallace College as well as in other colleges and normal 
schools. He became a teacher in Kent State in 1917. He 
was admired by students, faculty members, and citizens 
for his tolerance, his sense of justice, and his ever-ready 
acts of charity. 

"This is peace — 

To lay up lasting treasure 

Of perfect service rendered, duties done, 

In charity, soft speech, and stainless days. 

These shall not fade away. 

Nor death dispraise. 

When the mild and just die, sweet airs breathe; 

The world grows richer, as if a desert stream 

Should sink away to sparkle up again 

Purer, with broader gleam." 



Page thirty-four 











(fr qitnitfl Sclfco f 





Emmet C. Stopher 
A.B. 

Superintendent of 
Training School 




May H. Prentice 
Director of Training 




Frank N. Harsch,B.Sc. 

Principal of High School 
Training Department 




Edith M. Olson, B.S. 
Training Supervisor 






Page thirty-six 





Amy Irene Heriff 
B.S., M.A. 

Training Supervisor 




Nora O'Rourke, B.S. 
High School Critic 




Isabelle Hazen, M.A. 
High School Critic 




Maude L.Van Antwerp 
B.S. 

Training Supervisor 



Page thirty-seven 








MlKTIE MABIE 
Pd.M., A.B., B.S. 

Training Supervisor 




Bess Dunstan Rider 
B.S. 

Training Supervisor 
















Ida C. Jacobson 
Training Supervisor 







Rena M. Pottorf 
Instructor in Art 



Page thirty-eight 





Vera Morris 
B.S. in Ed. 

High School Critic 




Laura Hill, B.S. in Ed. 
Training Supervisor 




Ada Hyatt, B.S. 
Train ing Supervisor 




Elsie Mabie 
A.B., Pd.M., Ph.B. 

Training Supervisor 



Page thirty-nine 







Ruth Parrish 
Training Supervisor 




Elsie Musolf, B.S. 
Training Supervisor 




Margaret Jeffrey 
Training Supervisor 




Herta Heberlein 
Green 

Instructor Kindergarten 
Department 






Page forty 



<^ 







Ora Bell Bachman 
Instructor in Music 



Mittie Smith, R. N. 
Nurse 




Edith Tope, A.B. 
Instructor in Extension 




Mrs. Jane Martin 
Art 



Page forty-one 



Additional Summer Term 



FACULTY MEMBERS 



Agriculture 

E. D. Adams, B.S. in Ag. 
C. R. Shumway, B.S. in Ag. 



Home Economics 
Susan B. Garberson 



Art 

Alice Mary Aiken, M.A. 
Winifred Culver 
Fillette Many 
Evalyn Riebe, A.B. 
Nelle Adams Smith 



Kindergarten-Primary 

Gladys Buser 
Florence M. Pepper 



Manual Training 






Biology 

E. Annette Hinds, M.A. 
Marian E. Mills, A.M. 



Education 

C. J. Bowman, M.A. 
S. Herrick Layton, Ph.D. 
U. L. Light, A.B. 
W. F. Simpson, M.A. 
L. Ethel Spray, A.B. 
E. G. Walker, A.M. 
W. A. Walls, M.A. 



J. C. Kaag 

Charles H. Rausch, B.S. in Ed. 



Mathematics 

Frank A. Ferguson, M.A. 
W. G. Gingery, M.A. 
A. L. Walker, Ph.B. 



Music 
Eliza Carmichael 









English 

Henry Gronert, A.M. 

Mrs. Mildred Mozena, B.S. in Ed. 

Dwight Packard, B.S. in Ed. 

Ella J. Slutz, A.B. 

William E. Wenner, A.M. 

Geography 

Gilbert Roberts, B.S. in Ed. 
Amy E. Ware, M.A. 



History and Social Science 

U. M. McCaughey, A.M. 
R. L. Packard, A.B. 



Hygiene and Physical Education 

M. M. Byrne, D.D.S. 
Mrs. Eloise Irwin, A.B. 
Lois M. Merkel, A.B. 
Isabelle Oktavec, B.S. 



Reading 

Mrs. Ruth A. Damon, B.S. in Ed. 

Una Beem Elliott 

Mrs. Mildred Hoeffler 

Elizabeth Laughlin 

Elizabeth Offerman, B.S. in Ed. 

Ada B. Weyer 



Page forty-two 





T)eQ ree Senior*. 





HELEN DAPHNE HAHN 

Garrettsville, 



Ohio 



Treasurer Senior Class, Social Sci- 
ence Society, Annual Board. 
"She was so thrifty and good, that 
her name passed into a proverb." 



WILLIS R. ROOT 



Warsaw, Ohio 



President Senior Class, Masonic 
Fraternity, Gamma Tau Delta, An- 
nual Board, Kentonian Staff, Y. M. 
C. A., Social Science Society. 
"From all life's grapes, he pressed 
sweet wine." 



FLORENCE M. BABB 



Kent, Ohio 



Secretary Senior Class, Sigma Sig- 
ma Sigma, Dramatic Club, Kentoni- 
an Staff, Y. W. C. A., Off Campus 
Club, Annual Board. 
"For never saw I mein or face 
In which more plainly I could trace 
benignity and home-bred sense." 



Page forty-four 



HOWARD F. JENNINGS 

Ravenna, Ohio 

Vice-President Senior Class, Gam- 
ma Tau Delta, Y. M. C. A., Varsity 
"K" Club, Blue and Gold Debating 
Society. 

"He must be an university of 
knowledges." 




PHILIP E. BAIRD 

Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio 

Masonic Fraternity, Assistant, Com- 
mercial Dept. 

"With suclt a comrade, such a friend 
I fain would walk 'til journey's 
end." 



CLEMENS E. BLAUCH Aurora, Ohio 

"Work like a man, but don't be 
worked to death." 



KATHARINE DIETERICH 

Tallmadge, Ohio 

Senior Committee, Off Campus Club. 

"And all about the soci-al air 
Is sweeter for her coining." 



FRANCES BOETTLER 



Kent, Ohio 



Sigma Sigma Sigma, Social Science 
Society, Off Campus Club, Women's 
League. 

"I would be true for there are those 

who trust me. 
I would be pure for there are those 

who care." 



ARDIS BURROUGHS 



Kent, Ohio 



Sigma Sigma Sigma, Annual Board, 
Women's League. 

"I sang as children sing. 
Fitting tunes to everything. 
Loving life for its own sake." 






Page forty-five 




HOWARD D. EVANS 



Kent, Ohio 



Kappa Mu Kappa, Senior Commit- 
tee, Y. M. C. A., Exchange Manager. 

"Not a better man was found, by 
the crier on his round." 



RUTH FELT 



Garretsville, Ohio 



"Done with indoor complaints, li- 
braries, querulous criticisms, strong 
and content I travel the open road.'' 



KATHARINE FRASE 

Barberton, Ohio 

Sigma Sigma Sigma, Off Campus 
Club, Social Science Society, Annual 
Board, Assistant, Biology Dept. 

"Her thoughts are fixed on dusty 
shelves, 

Where musty volumes hide them- 
selves." 



LOUISE V. FENTON 



Kent, Ohio 



Sigma Sigma Sigma, Kentonian 
Staff. 

"In thy heart the dew of youth, 
On thy lips the smile of truth." 



GLENN FRANCIS Martinsburg, Ohio 

Kappa Mu Kappa, Men's Union, 
Varsity "K" Club. 

"Let us have wine, women, mirth, 

and laughter — 
Sermons and soda ivater the day 

after." 



Page forty-six 




THIERRA GANYARD Medina, Ohio 

Off Campus Club, Senior Commit- 
tee, Social Science Society. 

"Then be not coy, but use your time 
And while you may go marry." 



HARVEY J. GIFFORD 

Warrenville, Ohio 

Delta Phi Sigma, Masonic Frater- 
nity, Social Science Society, Glee 
Club, Orchestra. 

"While we were changing, he altered 

not; 
We might forget, but he never for- 
got." 



KATHRYN KINGSLEY 
Off Campus Club 



Kent, Ohio 



"Her lever was the ivand of art, 
Her fulcrum was the human heart." 



RAYMOND WILLIS GLASS 

Neivton Falls, Ohio 

Y. M. C. A., Blue and Gold Debat- 
ing Society. 

"And whatever skies above me, 
here's a heart for any fate." 



VERA MAY HARRINGTON 

Akron, Ohio 

Social Science Society, Lowry Hall. 

"And for all the base lies that the 

almanacs hold, 
While we've youth in our hearts we 

can never grow old." 



Page forty-seven 




MYRTLE M. MANEELY 

Youngstown, Ohio 

"If you would be well served, you 
must serve yourself." 






WILLA MAY MARKLEY 

Conotton, Ohio 

Off Campus Club 

"Sprung from, a saintly race that 

never could, 
From Youth to Age, be anything 

but good." 



CLIFFORD MORRIS Glenmont, Ohio 

Kappa Mu Kappa, Men's Union, 
Kent State Council, Annual Board, 
Varsity "K" Club, Y. M. C. A., So- 
cial Science Society. 

"Time shall moult away his wings, 

ere he shall discover, 
In. the tvhole wide world again such 

a constant lover." 



DONNA DEAN McBRIDE Kent, Ohio 

Annual Board 

"All good ivork is done that way, 
without boasting, without difficul- 
ty, without hesitation." 



LAUSON McCARDEL 

Far, West Virginia 

Delta Phi Sigma, Y. M. C. A., Ath- 
letic Board. 

"He never forgets us, as others will 

do, 
I am sure he knows me, and I think 

he knoivs you." 



Page forty-eight 




ELIZABETH MARY NEFF 

Canton, Ohio 

"I cannot die 'till I have achieved 
my destiny. Then let Death come; 
I shall have built my monument." 



KATHARINE NETHERCUT 

Cleveland, Ohio 
Senior Committee. 

"And welcome, whereso'er she went, 
A calm and gracious element." 



LUCILE SHERMAN Ravenna, Ohio 

Senior Committee 

"Flowers spring to blossom where 
she walks the careful ways of duty." 



JOHN J. SCHIELY Cleveland, Ohio 

Kappa Mu Kappa. 

"Square built, hearty and strong, 
with an odor of ocean around him." 



BENJAMIN SCHROEDER 

South Euclid, Ohio 

Kappa Mu Kappa, Social Science 
Society. Kent State Council, Senior 
Committee, Men's Union, Y. M. C. 
A. 

"Who is he that towers above the 
others, Ajax the Great, or bold Ido- 
meucus?" 



Page forty-nine 








VIRGINIA SKELLEY Cleveland, Ohio 

Phi Lambda Tau, Senior Commit- 
tee, Annual Board. 
"A beautiful and happy girl, 
With step as light as summer air." 



P. E. SPAEHT 



Kent, Ohio 



GLADYS E. STEM 
Ukulele Club 



Kent, Ohio 



"If you had a ukulele, you'd ivant to 
play it too." 






CHARLES F. SPANGLER 

Thornville, Ohio 

Gamma Tau Delta, Senior Commit- 
tee, Dramatic Club. 

"Will it be a rich old merchant in a 
square-tied white cravat, 

Or Selectman of a village in a pre- 
historic hat?" 



IVAN R. STATLER 



Rome, Ohio 



Delta Phi Sigma, Masonic Frater- 
nity, Senior Committee, Kent State 
Council, Editor Annual Board, Y. 
M. C. A., Social Science Society. 

"Goodness and Greatness are not 
means but ends. 

Hath he not always treasures, al- 
ways friends?" 



Page fifty 




E. EARL SULTEEN Muncie, Indiana 

Gamma Tau Delta, Y. M. C. A., Blue 
and Gold Debating Society. 

"He early learned the poiver to pay 
His cheerful, self-reliant way." 



ERNEST A. TABLER Orivell, Ohio 

Masonic Fraternity, Annual Board, 
Mathematics Club. 

"You think he's all fun, but, the 
ungels laugh, too, at the good he has 
done." 



MAE WILLIAMS 



Kent, Ohio 



Sig-ma Sigma Sigma, Off Campus 
Club, Social Science Society, Treble 
Cleft Club. 

"Mildest of manners and gentlest 
of heart." 



IRWIN A. VOLTZ 



Canton, Ohio 



Senior Committee, Masonic Frater- 
nity, Social Science Society, Search- 
light Staff. 

"Whatsoever thy hand findeth to 
do, do it with thy might." 



BURDETTE SUMNER WEAVER 

Uniontown, Ohio 

Social Science Society, Y. M. C. A., 
Glee Club. 

"He leaves the remembrance of all 

that was best, 
Love, friendship, and hope, and the 

promise of rest." 



Page fifty-one 




MARION A. WOLCOTT Kent, Ohio 
Kappa Mu Kappa 
"Go on. For thou hast chosen well.'' 



FAYE B. WOLFE 

Neiv Lexington, Ohio 

Sigma Sigma Sigma, Pan Hellenic 
Council, Kentonian Staff, Off Cam- 
pus Club, Senior Committee, Social 
Science Society. 

"A perfect woman, nobly planned, 
To warn, to comfort, and command." 



PAUL ELLIOT 



BURGETT EVERETT YEO 

Ravenna, Ohio 

Blue and Gold Debating Society, 
Masonic Fraternity, Y. M. C. A., 
Senior Committee. 

"With rarest gifts of heart and 
head, from manliest stock inherited. 
Whom no one met at first but took, 
a second awed, but ivondering look." 



E. H. YOUNGEN 



Ragersville, Ohio 



Delta Phi Sigma, Y. M. C. A., Senior 
Committee, Varsity "K" Club. 

"The wide world has not wealth to 
buy the power in my right hand." 



Page fifty-tivo 






Vn$<r$ra$uat 




cs 




John Ziegler 
Frieda Phelps 



Glenna Stine 
Marion King 



Eleanor Lossee 
Ellis Betzer 



Carl Baldwin 



Gus Peterka 
Jason C. Murlin 



Bernice Hixenbaugh 



Virgel Shilling Clarence Gerron 




Helen Blake Dennis E. Stewart 




Claude Graber 




Eva N. Spencer Ben R. Colville 




Gertrude Huffman Eugene Feeley 




Lucille Pearce 




P. H. Burkett Arrita Drew 




Harold C. Hulme Genevive Wright 




Raymond E. Trachsel 




Page fifty-four 






Page fifty-five 



Alice Young 
Kenneth Brown 



Naomi Hanna 
Mildred Stander 



Evelyn Long 



Florence J. Grant Grace Herbkersman 

J. Edward Spinneweber Emily M. Rosen 

Gwendolyn Drew 



Mignonne Bryant 
Charles Dunn 



Lillian Rice 
Kathleen Fisher 



Anna Murray 



Helen Dormer 
Kenneth Cook 



Irma Iskall 
Edith Jones 



Antoinette Link 



Frances Poorman 
Francis Mull 



Carmella Myers 
Evelyn Caris 



Frances Eging 



Page fifty-six 





Page fifty-xeren 




Harlan Carson 
Virginia Webber 



Violet Creps 
Eugene Barry 



Mildred Nickerson 



Ruth Swinehart 
Clark Line 



Dorothea Harris 
Frances Blake 



Ralph Byrne 



Hilda Bachman 
Christine Steinmetz 



Archie Davis 
Richard Davis 



Elizabeth Boyd 
Betty Pille 



Frank Hall 
Donald Menough 



Margaret Rose 



Chester Davis 
Roy Merrill 



Merna Elliman 
Vera Jackson 



J. W. Hall 



Page fifty-eight 




Page fifty-nine 



Kathryn Thomas 
Thelma Davis 



Rosalie Sipos 



Harold Polen 
Robert Hall 



Ralph Spangler Anna Wells 

Paul Cranz Henrietta Beechy 

Karl Muster 






Eugene Deakins 
Clarence Miller 



Jane Mason 
Irma Youngen 



Harriet Myers Harold Dunlavy 

Albert Heritage Evalena dinger 

Travis Bailey 



Kenneth Butler 
Clyde Piatt 



Avis Copeland 
Ruth Geib 



Jack Chernin 



Page sixty 







Page sixty-one 







Wm. E. Tabler 
Helen Morgan 



Hester Thomas 
Jean Rothwel] 



Abe Schwartz 



Louise Kestle 
Kenneth Nash 



Marian Morsback 
Marie Jean 
Esther Kirkbride 



Clyde Olinger 
Ruby Dort 



Edna Horn 
Chas. Randolph 





Miran Laird 


Beulah Ray 




Norbert E 


McDermott 


Eileen Hulesman 






Mary Ellen Miller 




Ward W. 


Davis 


Joe Delone 




Herbert N 


Woodworth 


Philomena Zappols 






LeRoy 


Rossow 


Page 


sixty-two 








Page sixty-three 



Mel McDermott 
Mildred Miller 



Ann Moore 
Agnes Quinlan 



Clyde Weasner 



Cora Robinson 



Lucy Stadler 
Helen Lane 



Clyde Vair 
Claud Vair 



Edith Heard 
Naomi Johnson 



Edith Grove 
Alice Elgin 



Jessie Bradshaw Craig Nickel 

Elizabeth Truscot Merrel Fuller 

Margaret Taylor 



Osborne Abbey Dorothy Stewart 

Beatrice Hoobler Helen Seidel 

Earl Weikel 



Page sixty-four 










vwrmmmmmmmmm* 



Page sixty- five 




Edith Heard 
Dixie Wales 



Edith Tripcony 
Frank Curtis 



Jane Brewster 



Dorothy Grimm 
Sherman Crow 



Mary Brenneman 
Harriet Muche 



Jane Gibson 



Margaret Hoffman 
Charles Arnold 



Grace McCune 
Lucille Ewin.tr 



Ethel Frishknet 
Bernice Beckley 



Robert Bohecker 
Vere Beik 



Laura Fleming 



Ruby Fleming 
Minton E. Blauch 



Edith Grove 
Ruth Sweeney 



Alice Crosby 



Page sixty-six 




■ :: :-K,- : 







Edward Harris 


Lola Merydith 




Edna Tarr 


Raymond A. Gooch 


s 


Donald Baker 


Ellen Kiss 




Margaret Donaldson 


R. B. Spacht 




Page sixty-eight 










"QipPoma Seniors 








Elizabeth Bloor 
Naida Camp 



Kenneth Carpenter 
Ethel Corbett 



Hazel Bowman 



Mildred Irene Carr Ann Chalk 

Elizabeth Beynon Mary Louise Dunn 

Louise Brownell 



Marion Carlile 
Claire Cain 



Fern Mollenkops 
Naomi Bell 



Pauline Yant 
Louise Fargo 



Thelma Young 
Gertrude Cain 



Elizabeth Beynon 
Walter H. Jantz 



Helen Hippie 



Ethel Corbitt 
Mary Louise Dunn 
Isabell Bucklin 



Page seventy 




»^^SBfc» 



Page seventy-one 




Pearl 0. Warner 
Lelia Doty 



Ruth Kahan 
Jessie Peoples 



Lucy McConnell 
Nellie Close 



Dorothy Plum 



Ernestine Stoll 
Anna Wheatley 



Laura Murray 






Amelia McClay 
Luella Stevenson 



Jessie Mae Green 
Mary Binnig 



Clare Trivison 
Freda M. Milligan 



Hannah Morgan 
Hannah Kanter 



Mabel B. Washington 



Murna Gage 
Helen Oyster 



Page seventy-two 



Maud Thomas 
Hannah Rabinovitz 
Elizabeth Kist 










*MC 



Page seventy-threi 




Vena Kopp Genevieve Moulder 

Francis Howenstine Halcyon Mae Neill 

Henrietta Luth 



Cecelia Jacobs 
Nina Miller 



Vilura Camp 
Hazel Levers 



Frances Gunther 



Marion MacLellan 
Harriet R. Myers 



Clara Eaten 
Stella Brigham 





Rose Lombard 




Fedelia Wallace 




Mary K. Brown 




Jeanette Carnes 




Effie McClellan 






Amanda Eberlein 




Mildred Fuller 




Gladys Miller 




Mabel Winchell 




Beatrice 


Grimm 




Page 


seventy-four 








Hazel Keener Mary S. E. Brown 

Mildred Waddington Frances Timmonds 

Isabella Underwood 



Martha Konicek 
Louise Haag 



Mary Styles 
Lena Chmitlin 



Evelyn Horton 



Margaret Donaghy 
Dorothy Leopold 



Maybelle Burke 
Blanche Thompson 



Elizabeth Switky Adelaide Carter 

Alice Murlin Violet Thornquist 

Martha Mackey 



Goldie Greenfield Elsie Kasserman 

Gladys Ford Helen Cameron 

Doris Sinclair 



Page seventy-six 








Pdf/c scrriitij-sereii 







Sarah Griffith Dixon Kathryn Greene 

Vena Kopp Lillian Hurwitz 

Saphronia Allen 



Bernice Warner 
Robert Albright 



Beth Yoder 



Arthur Gaffga 
Ethel Vine 



Marguerite Filmer 
Ruth Russell 



May Robinson 
Mary Pow 



Merrill Criss 
Rachel Valgo 



Ethel Johnson 
Maud Miller 



Marion Sperry 



Marguerite Ray Marion Wise 

Grace Russell Cleo Miller 

Georgia TeGrotenheimer 






Page seventy-eight 








Catherine Clevenger 
Bernice Guthery 

Minnie Erhart 



Florence Cain 
Verna Fisher 






Theodora Kloha 
Mary Stillinger 



Eleanor Iammarino 
Mary Louise McLean 



Georgia Santanzelo 



Gertrude Ericson 
Ethel McMaster 



Hazel Christian 
Lena Samuel 



Irene Polen 
Naomi Robertson 



Helen Nolan 
Wilma Louise Pratt 



Elsie Singer 



Abbie Morse 
Margaret Stage 



Sarabel Thompson 
Phylis Pollock 



Mollie Pavlic 



Page eighty 






/ 













Page eighty-one 








Ida L. Smith Elena Stocking 

Hazel Cook Angeline Grant 

Harriet L. Myers 



Josephine Mizn Mildred Sooy 

Kenneth Carpenter Myrtle Town 

Aurelia Washington 



Page eighty-tiro 





<^\ c vgc utop Jim j$r s 








Julia Chuey 
Gladys Benjamin 



Esther Butzer 
Willa Mae Cone 



Martha Borklund 



Gladys Brunn 
Veron Gordon 



Agnes Carson 
Mary Dickson 



Evelyn Williams 



Grace Hahn 
Phyllis Consol 



Charlotte Archibald 
Agnes Black 



Margaret L. Bender Evelyn Anthony 

Lorena Beeler Marie Aufderheide 

Pearl Brinker 



Lucina Hohman Amy Norene Collingwood 

Ellen Beck Beatrice Giber 

Velma Bose 



Page eighty-four 




Gladys Hindman Irene Lutz 

Ethel Flickinger Helen Murry 

Margery Shope 



Florence Keyser Jessie Miklovic 

Faye Paisley Madge Paisley 

Leonore Mueller 



Alice Countryman 
Olive Werrick 



Esther Keay 
Theeda Jones 






Rhodal Pearce 
Mae E. Connor 



Martha Birkbeck 
Blanche Culler 



Bertha Sturgis 



Esther Farrelly Helen Porter 

Mrs. Dorothy Smith Leila Riley 

Jessie Davis 



Page eighty-six 




Page eightysevi n 




Viola Clark 
Pauline Gaston 



Jeane Gorham 
Doris Iddings 



Agnes O'Horo 



Jennie Garrod 
Florence Gunderson 

Helen Murphy 



Dorothy Hall 
Helen Flinn 



Hazel Smith 

C. Gerald Haines 



Lela Nichols 
Elinor 0. Mallery 



Ottilia Syeghy Leah Hawley 

Georgeana Reed Helen Crooks 

Mildred Awkerman 



Esther Evans 




Minnie Harder 






Gladys Long 


Melva Moore 


Bernice Dunbar 






Page eighty-eight 






















Harriet Girton 
Kathryn Orell 



Lonera Hulbert 



Irma Bate 
Olive Walter 



Helen Oyster 
Lillian Moss 



Rose Wexler 
Frances Kanagy 



Monica McCarthy 



Clara Usher 
Dorothy Tredway 



Mapel Pittman 
Blanch Jones 






Opal Seaman 
Gladys Hitchings 



Dorothy Sapp 
Marion Fisher 





Helene Luse 




Elizabeth A. 


Miller 


Lenore Kistler 


Faye Slutz 


Elizabeth Konzie 


Alma Walker 


rage ninety 
■ ^ 














Agatha James 
Jessie Worcester 



Elsie M. Stroup 
Irma Marie Myers 



Willima Cassell 



Neva May Zuber 
Jane Caldwell 



Elizabeth A. Miller 
Carrie Boyle 



Margaret Hayes 



Elvira Cywinski Louise Stein 

Clifford Cunningham Mary M. Sanderson 

Luetta Bodin 



Betty Murray 
Helen Smithermer 



Charlotte McKenna 
Anna Lanx 



Nellie Lee 



Esther 


Baldwin 


Ruth 


E. 


Reynolds 


Christine Mollison Anna M. Hawley 






Eileen Faloon 






Page ninety-two 












Virginia Smith 
Faye Smith 



Lucille Baker 



Josephine Mecera 
Frances Metts 



Gayle Rinehart 
Lucy Kaufman 



Mitchell Snyder 
Nellie Walker 



Delia Lyndes 



Margaret Floyd 
Edith Whitacre 



Alice Wire 
Henrietta Reed 



Marjorie Blalock 
Melva Moore 



Clara Lindsay 
Ruth Morledge 



Ellen Horn 



Esther Venner 
Hazel Ginther 



Eulalia Ludlam 
Ida Hershkovitz 



Louis G. Billeter 



Page ninety-four 







p: tf'jmtmy<fip^T* .:■&. : ''-^iKJf jg 










Page ninety-fire 




Viola Urmison 
Ellen Burgeson 



^<y 



Alice Smith 
Gloria Wright 



Pearl Woodings 



Irene McLaughlin 
Dorothy Lance 



Irene Riddle 
Helen Rowalt 



Laura Hall 






Antonnette Scaleeta 
Elsie Eckert 



Minnie Capriato 
Mae Irene Nelson 



Julia Prindle 


Mary McConnell 


Dorothy Lutz 


Sophia Brown 




Olive Ott 


Beula Mock 


Nola Smith 


Louise Lynch 


Ethel M. Gardner 




Margaret Gill 


Page ninety-six 







Pacjc ninety-seven 







Helen McGarvey Pearl Snyder 

Mabel Wright Alice Chmitlin 

Alice Marie Sheldon 



Marguerite Lynn Mary Yarwood 

Laura Wood Alice Pollard 

Estelle Gestcher 



Helen Van Winkle 
Elizabeth Thomas 



Lillian Matlas 
Elsie Richards 






Nettie Smith Anna Kovalchick 

E. Marie Miller Mabel Moss 

Sophia Weltman 



Lois Weichel Nelda Manypenny 

Dorothy Sponseller Helen Addis 

Ora Carter 









Page ninety-eight 




■■EifliBMHHHHBMHB^MHHamaBi 



Page ninety-nine 




Marguerite Kienle Jean Stuart 

R. J. Woolman Isabella Matley 

Martha Wells 



S. H. Watkins Elizabeth Leickheim 

Rebecca Vintsky Ellen King 

Earl Miller 



Warren Smith 
Alma Helmling 



Beatrice Johnston 
E. T. Witham 






Margaret E. Walker Ella Springer 

Wm. Haiahan Helen V. Monegan 

Bernice VanHyning 



Olive Smith Jennie Schroyer 

Karl W. Sander Feme Strawn 

Glenna Overholt 



Page one hundred 







3&K3MKEI1I5BE 







SlBfe* 





/'fijrc o»e lumdred one 




Katherine Ladd Mary C. Brown 

Elma Evans Kathleen Starkes (Senior) 

Grace Davidson 



Doris Gillette 
Aurlilia Lyons 



Jay L. White (Senior) 
Gladys Tarr 
Mary Bissell 



Ruth Knecht Caroline Baun 

Alma Lang (Senior) Katherine E. Gilbert 

Doris Scroggie 



Page one hundred two 









ft ^icftP ^m nm g 














KENT State's Department of Physical Education is unique in that it 
is called upon not only to carry forward the program of required 
activities which fills so important a place in the lives of all college 
men, but it also offers a four-year course or a major in Physical Educa- 
tion which leads to a special college diploma in addition to the Degree of 
B.S. in Education. It is also unique in that the whole athletic and recre- 
ational life of the men is directed by the staff of this department. Inter- 
collegiate contests are scheduled, varsity teams are coached, and the de- 
tails of the business are carried out by the staff. 

Kent State was one of the first Normal Colleges to recognize physi- 

' cal education activities as worthy of credit toward the degree. It is an 

established fact that for efficient service it is necessary to have a "sound 

body and a sound mind." On entering at Kent State the students are 

given a careful physical examination. 

The present staff consists of: Dr. A. 0. Deweese, School Physician 
and Head of the Department of Physical Education ; Frank L. Oktavec, 
Director of Athletics ; Coach Merle Wagoner, Coach and Instructor in 
Physical Education. 

Athletics at Kent State were in an unusually depressed condition 
when Coach Merle Wagoner and Director Frank L. Oktavec came to take 
charge in the fall of '25. The college had lost 37 consecutive games scor- 
• ing only one touchdown in all these games. Although Kent won but one 
game she can boast of going through a whole season with but one defeat. 
The success of this season cannot be attributed to any one player but we 
do owe Coach Wagoner much praise for the success of the past season. 
His general good spirits and his contagious enthusiasm have already won 
for him the respect of the college men and there is no doubt but what his 
success for another season will prove just as successful. 



Page one hundred five 





Page one hundred six 




Statistics Varsity Football Squad 1925 



High School 
Western Reserve Academy 
Ravenna Township 
Ravenna Township 
Ravenna Township 
Akron West 
Kent State 
Kent State 
Ravenna Township 
Martinsburg 
Cuyahoga Falls 
Rye, N. Y. 
Martinsburg 
Rye, N. Y. 
Glenmont 
Fredericktown 
Langley, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Kent, Roosevelt 
East Tech, Cleveland 
Iona Prep., New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Wooster 
Rootstown 
Chesterville 
Ravenna Township 
Bedford 

Langley, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Ravenna Township 

Page one hundred eight 



Player 
Peterka (Capt.) 
Vair 
Jennings 
C. Davis 
Chernin 
F. Hall 
R. Hall 

Menough (Capt.-elect) 
Colville 
Crosby 
Feeley 
Francis 
Harvey 
Morris 
Levering 
Brown 

N. McDermott 
Schwartz 
Hallihan 
Spangler 
Barry 
Arnold 
A. Davis 
Burkett 
Deakins 
Dunlevy 






150 


F.B. 


144 


C. 


144 


Q.B. 


160 


R.H. 


155 


C. 


151 


L.G. 


155 


L.G. 


172 


R.E. 


120 


R.E. 


120 


R.E. 


150 


L.G. 


160 


R.H. 




Page one hundred tiiii* 




Dr. A. 0. DeWeese came to Kent State 
College in October, '24, to assume the Direc- 
torship of the Department of Health and 
Physical Education. For the past several 
years he has been Professor of Physiology 
and Pharmachology in the University of 
Louisville Medical School. He was also as- 
sociated with Dr. Haven Emerson in the 
Health and Medical Survey of Cities, and 
was staff physician for the Children's Clinic 
Orphanage in Louisville. Dr. DeWeese is a 
normal school and a university graduate. 





Frank L. Oktavec assumed the position 
as Director of Athletics in October, '25. He 
received his preliminary training in the 
public schools of New York City. He at- 
tended the University of Dubuque and later 
Columbia University where he received both 
his B.S. and M.A. Degree. During the war 
Mr. Oktavec served in the French Foreign 
Legion. Before coming to Kent he taught 
at Spring Valley, White Plains, N. Y., and 
was for a while engaged in settlement work 
in New York City. 



Merle Wagoner began his work as coach 
in October, '25. Coach Wagoner received 
his preliminary training at Mercersburg 
Academy in Pennsylvania where he played 
football four years. He played quarterback 
and end on the championship team in '11 
and '12, when his school was champion of 
the United States in the Academy circles. 
Coach Wagoner also holds a state record for 
pole vaulting. He is a graduate of Ohio 
State University. 

Before coming to Kent Coach Wagoner 
was coach at West Tech where he produced 
three championship teams. 




Page one hundred ten 








Page nne hundred eleven 







Puyc one hundred thirteen 







Page one hundred fourteen 










The Season Record 

Kent State Hiram 

Kent State Edinboro 

Kent State ._. 6 Indiana 6 

Kent State 7 West Liberty 6 

Kent State Findlay 12 

HIRAM 

In the first game of the season Kent held, and decisively outplayed 
Hiram College, but were forced to accept a 0-0 verdict. Despite the fact 
that the game was played on a muddy field, it proved to be a great day 
for Kent. Hiram played a hard game but Kent's line plunges held her 
from scoring. The team was badly crippled when Joe Delone was taken 
from the field with a broken ankle. Even though the score was 0-0 the 
inexperienced Kent gridders felt very confident of future possibilities. 

EDINBORO 

"A team that will not, cannot be beaten," was Kent's motto when 
the team traveled to Edinboro. The field was a slough of mud and water, 
the remains of an eight-inch snow. The Edinboro team was much strong- 
er than anticipated and Kent was forced to another tie score. On the first 
kickoff of the game, Schwartz ran 85 yards, carrying the ball to Edin- 
boro's 5-yard line. This was a good beginning for Kent, but on the next 
play Kent fumbled the ball. The ball was kicked down the field by Edin- 
boro and from there on neither team seemed able to gain much ground. 

INDIANA 

With greater determination than ever to win Kent traveled to Indi- 
ana with the hopes of revenge for last year's defeat. Indiana scored 
early in the quarter ; this only made Kent fight harder. Hall broke through 
Indiana's line time after time to stop the fast Indiana backs. Kent played 
a good game but a series of fumbles, two of them within Indiana's 20- 
yard line prevented her from scoring again. In the last 37 seconds of 
play Kent saved the day when Francis caught a pass and ran 35 yards for 
a touchdown. 

WEST LIBERTY 

The largest number of fans that ever witnessed a game in the his- 
tory of the college saw Kent spoil the game for West Liberty when Kent 
won her first victory. The game was the best and undoubtedly the most 
interesting of the season. Kent carried the battle to the opponent's territory 
and only three times during the whole game did West Liberty invade our 
territory. By a series of bucks and passes the ball was carried to within 
a couple of yards of the opponent's goal. Mel McDermott carried the ball 
for a touchdown and kicked the goal. 

FINDLAY 

The last game of the season was a great disappointment to the whole 
college. The game was made interesting by numerous sensational passes 
and broken field runs. During the second quarter of the game Kent car- 
ried the ball to Findlay's six-inch line, but was unable to carry it over. 
Three minutes later a Findlay back broke through, picked up a fumble 
and ran 50 yards for a touchdown. Kent State's hopes were dashed on the 
rocks and from there on Kent seemed helpless. 

Page one hundred sixteen 




a$ 



U& 



i>a 








^a 













Basketball Squad 1926 



Back row — Coach Wagoner : Harris, guard : Vair, center ; M. McDermott, guard ; DeLeone, manager. 
Front row — Peterka. center; Arnold, center; (Capt.) Feeley, guard; Francis, forward; N. McDer- 
mott, forward. 






Page one hundred eighteen 



JJ 









Feeley (Capt.) 



Arnold 





Francis 
Page one hundred unit-teen. 











PETERKA 



HARRIS 



Games 



Kent State 24 

Kent State 19 

Kent State 18 

Kent State 29 

Kent State * 23 

Kent State 20 

Kent State 40 

Kent State 37 

Kent State 42 

Kent State 23 

Kent State 37 

Kent State 28 

Kent State 30 

Kent State 38 

Total 408 

Page one hundred twenty 



Mt. Union 37 

Wilmington 29 

West Liberty 28 

Cleveland Chiropractic College .18 

Ashland 30 

West Liberty 21 

Slippery Rock . ..36 

Edinboro 41 

Findlay . 13 

Bowling Green _ 47 

Findlay 23 

Edinboro 30 

Polish College 29 

Slippery Rock 29 

Total ■ 412 







Basketball Season 1926 



KENT STATE 24 



MT. UNION 37 



While a packed gym, including old grads, friends, students, and 
coaches looked on dubiously, the team received its first workout of the 
year. Although defeated in this game the team showed possibilities of 
a winning team. After all, this did not seem so much like a "drubbing," 
as Mt. Union climbed to the head of the conference list. 



Kent State 



Mt. Union 



Shedden rf 3 3 9 

N. McDermott rf __1 2 

Curtiss If 3 1 5 

Arnold c 1 2 4 

Feeley rg 1 2 

Francis rg 

M. McDermott lg .„_0 1 1 

Graber lg 

Davis rg 

Total 9 6 24 



Labor rf 2 2 6 

Orr rf Oil 

Wilcoxen If _____ 5 1 11 

Rooth If 

Miller c 2 1 5 

Mills rg .....3 1 7 

Staff rg 

Ball lg 3 1 7 

Harvey lg 

Total 15 7 37 



KENT STATE 18 



WILMINGTON 29 



Wilmington was a real fighting team and succeeded in forcing Kent 
State to a 18-29 verdict. Even this second successive defeat did not dis- 
courage the fighting Kent Staters. 



Kent State 

Curtiss rf 1 

N. McDermott rf 1 

Shedden If 

Vair c , 1 

Arnold c 3 


3 









1 




SUMMARY 

Wilmington 

5 Weimer rf __ 1 

2 A. Smith rf .. . 1 

Chance If 6 
2 Furnace If 

6 Brown c ... 

Gigler rg 3 

2 Walton rg . .0 

Metcalfe lg . 

1 F. Smith lg 

— 


3 


1 

1 
2 





5 

2 

13 


1 
8 







Peterka c 

McDermott rg 

Harris lg 




1 

...0 




Feeley lg 





Francis lg 








Total 



14 



18 



29 



Page one hundred twenty-one 




KENT STATE 18 WEST LIBERTY 28 

The first game away from home was played at West Liberty, W. Va. 
Kent State's team was handicapped by West Liberty's small floor and the 
dim lights and were forced to another defeat. 



N. McDerm 


Ke 
ott 


vt State 

rf 
3 
















SUMS 


6 
2 
2 

4 

2 

2 

18 


LA.RY 

West Liberty 
Hughs rf '. ___4 














8 


Shedden rf 


Garrison rf 

Lund If 




.__.. 4 





Vair If ...... 




.. 1 


8 


Curtiss If . 






.1 


Mahony If 


3 


fi 


Peterka c . 







...2 


Ellis rg 


3 


R 


Arnold c . 


C. Hughes lg 

Potts 









Graber rg 






...0 





Francis lg 






....1 


Robinson 








Feeley lg ... 






....0 


Total 


14 




M. McDern 


lOtt 


rg 


1 
....9 


?,8 


Total ... 









KENT STATE 29 CLEVELAND CHIROPRACTIC SCHOOL 18 

SUMMARY 
Kent State Cleveland Chi. College 



Curtiss rf 3 6 

N. McDermott If ......0 1 1 

Arnold c 4 1 9 

M. McDermott rg ......0 

Feeley lg 2 1 5 

Vair . 1 1 

Peterka 

Harris , 

Graber 1 1 

Davis 

Francis 

Total .22 7 29 
Page one hundred tiventy-tivo 



Clucas rf 1 

J. Schwartz If 1 

Hudec rg 1 

Sikorski rg 

Ramsy lg 

M. Schwartz 

Mathias 2 

Spolnik 2 

Total 7 






2 


2 


4 


1 


3 




















1 


5 





4 



18 










KENT STATE 23 



ASHLAND 30 



With the breaks continually against them, the Blue and Gold team 
went down in defeat again. The home team fought a hard game but the 
visitors proved too much for them. 



Kent State 

Peterka If 2 3 

N. McDermott rf ___1 1 

Arnold c 3 1 

M. McDermott rg ___1 

Feeley lg 2 

Curtiss ._. 

Graber . 

Total 9 5 



SUMMARY 

Ashland 

7 Tersch rf .. .2 

3 Echelberger If .. ...2 

7 Worstler c 

2 Needham rg ...3 

4 Kellogg lg .. ...6 

Erch lg .. 1 

— 

— Total ...,14 

23 






4 





4 








1 


7 


1 


13 





2 



30 



KENT STATE 20 



WEST LIBERTY 21 



W T est Liberty beat Kent State in the most thrilling game of the sea- 
son. Kent State lost to its old rival, West Liberty, by a close score of 
20-21. The game went nip and tuck and as the last quarter began it was 
evident that it was anybody's game. The blue and gold slipped through 
a goal which gave them the lead by one point; the time-keeper's watch 
showing 60 seconds to play. Unlucky for Kent the West Virginians 
dropped the sphere through the basket giving them the game by one 
point. 



Kent State 

Peterka rf .....3 2 

Arnold c 2 

N. McDermott If ...1 

M. McDermott rg 

Feeley lg . 2 1 

Francis 1 1 

Graber 

Vair 

Harris 

Total 7 5 



SUMMARY 

West Liberty 

8 Lund rf . ...2 

2 J. Hughes If .. ...3 

2 Mahoney c ...1 

Ellis rg __. 2 

5 Robertson lg .. .0 

3 Ganison 

C. Hughes . ...0 

Potts 

— 

— Total 8 
20 



1 


5 





6 


1 


3 


1 


5 


1 


1 

















1 



21 



Page one hundred twenty-three 







KENT STATE 40 



SLIPPERY ROCK 36 



The first real college victory occurred when Slippery Rock, after 
battling one of the hardest games of the season went home with a 40-36 
defeat chalked up against them. The Blue and Gold quintet showed some 
of the fans that there was still "A few songs in the Old Fiddle." 



Kent State 

Curtiss rf 

N. McDermott If __7 1 

Arnold c 3 1 

M. McDermott rg 1 

Feeley lg 1 

Peterka rf 6 

Harris rg 1 

Baldwin If 

Total 19 2 



SUMMARY 

Slippery Rock 

Carroll rf 2 

15 Kruger If 9 

7 Whitehill c 4 

2 Metzger rg 2 

2 McMahon lg 

12 White rf 1 

2 Stinson c 

Riper lg 

40 Total 18 






4 





18 





8 





4 











2 















36 



KENT STATE 37 



EDINBORO 41 



Edinboro was an undefeated team, not only before coming to Kent, 
but also on going away. Everyone was well pleased with the result of this 
game as they watched Kent keep well on the trail of the Pennsylvanians. 



Kent State 

Curtiss rf 1 

N. McDermott If _...5 

Arnold c . 4 

Harris rg 

M. McDermott lg _.....0 

Peterka rf 5 

Baldwin c . 

Feeley rg 3 1 

Total . _....18 1 



SUMMARY 

Edinboro 

2 Camp rf 2 

10 Butler If 2 

8 Herbert c 2 

Porter rg A 

Williams lg 7 

10 Mink c : 

— 

7 Total 17 

37 



2 


6 


3 


7 





4 


1 


9 


1 


15 









41 



Page one hundred twenty-four 






KENT STATE 42 






FINDLAY 13 



The superior playing ability of the Blue and Gold quintet was again 
demonstrated when they showed Findlay up on their own floor. These 
two defeats helped a lot to make amends for the "trouncing" Findlay 
gave Kent State here last fall in football. 



Kent State 

Baldwin rf 2 2 

M. McDermott If ____6 2 

Arnold c 6 1 

Francis rg 1 1 

Feeley lg 2 

Curtiss 1 

Vair 1 

Harris 

Total 19 6 



SUMMARY 

Findlay 

4 Bricker rf _0 

14 Needles If ..__. ._1 

13 Lyle c 

3 Castir rg 1 

4 Blake lg 1 

2 Ensign 

2 Mowery 

Williams 

42 Total ...6 









1 


3 


3 


3 


1 


3 


1 


3 








1 


1 









13 



KENT STATE 23 



BOWLING GREEN 47 



Everything was not pie for Kent on the trip to Findlay and Bowling 
Green. A 23-47 verdict did a great deal to counterbalance the success of 
the night before. However Bowling Green was not a team to be smiled 
upon by any college quintet. 



Kent State 

N. McDermott rf .....A 1 

M. McDermott If . 2 2 

Arnold c 1 1 

Francis rg 

Feeley lg ...0 

Curtiss 1 

Vair 1 

Baldwin 1 

Total 9 5 



SUMMARY 

Bowling Green 

9 Bauchman rf 6 

6 Moscoe If _ 7 

3 Olds c __4 

Brand rg 1 

Skibbie lg . _.2 
2 Markle . .. 1 

1 Crice ...1 

2 Gill 1 

23 Total 23 






12 





14 





8 





2 





4 





2 





2 


1 


3 



1 47 



Page one hundred twenty-five 










KENT STATE 37 



FINDLAY 23 



Findlay proved unable to compete with the Blue and Gold team in 
basketball. The final game with Findlay was a walk-away for Kent State. 
They outclassed the opponents all around when it came to dribbling or 
shooting. The ball remained almost entirely in the possession of Kent. 
The final score was 37-23. 



Kent State 

Baldwin rf 

Curtiss If 1 


1 
1 
2 

2 
1 
1 
1 

9 


SUMJ 

1 
3 
4 
2 
6 
13 
7 
1 

37 


/[ARY 

Findlay 

Bricker rf 

Needles If 

Huffman c 

Blake rg 


2 

3 



?, 




1 

4 
1 
1 






4 

7 


Vair c 


_____1 


4 


Harris rg 


.....1 


5 


Feeley lg ... 


.2 


Castor If 


1 


3 


N. McDermott rf . 


6 
3 


Mowery 








M. McDermott If . 


Falkner 








Francis c 


Williams 

Ensign 











-14 





Total 









Total 8 



23 



KENT STATE 28 



EDINBORO 30 



The last game of the season was played with the championship Edin- 
boro team. Although Kent State was forced to a 28-30 score Coach 
Wagoner was well pleased with the playing of the team. 






SUMMARY 



Kent State 

N. McDermott rf __7 1 15 

M. McDermott If ......3 6 

Peterka c 1 1 3 

Feeley lg 

Francis rg 2 4 

Vair 

Harris 1 2 

Total 14 2 28 

Page one hundred twenty-six 





Edinboro 






Camp rf . 


3 


1 
1 



1 

5 




7 


Shield If . 


1 


3 


Herbert c 
Cooley rf 
Porter lg 
Williams 




2 

5 





5 

15 



Total .. 


11 


8 


30 







KENT STATE 30 POLISH COLLEGE 29 

The little Polish College rather surprised the Kent Staters by playing 
them a close game. However the Polish tossers were unable to call it a 
victory. 



Kent State 

Curtiss rf 4 

M. McDermott If _4 2 

Vair c 4 1 

Harris rg 

Feeley lg 

Francis 2 

N. McDermott 1 1 

Peterka 

Total ' ......13 6 



SUMMARY 



10 
9 


2 
3 




Polish College 



Furtek rf __7 

Sadlowski If 3 

Galica c 

Kurzawski rg 1 

Miska lg 2 

Miller 

Total 13 



1 


15 


2 


8 


1 


1 





9 





4 









29 



KENT STATE 29 



SLIPPERY ROCK 38 



The victory of the night before was not enough to carry the team 
through another similar performance. By the flashy playing of the Slip- 
pery Rock players Kent was forced to a defeat again. 



Kent State 

N. McDermott rf ...... 5 1 

M. McDermott If .... .4 1 

Peterka c 1 

Feeley rg 1 

Francis lg 

Arnold 2 1 

Total 13 4 



SUMMARY 

Slippery Rock 

11 Carroll rf 4 

9 Kruger If ...2 

2 Barnett c .6 

2 Metzger rg __ 1 

Whitehill lg .. 2 

5 — 

Total ..... ...15 

29 



1 


9 


3 


7 


1 


13 





2 


o 
O 


7 



8 38 



Page one hundred twenty-seven 







Baseball 1926 



ALTHOUGH it is too early in the season to make any reasonable pre- 
dictions as to the calibre of the 1926 baseball team, the present ap- 
pearances are that Coach Wagoner will mould an exceptional nine 
from the excellent material with which he has to work. On his squad 
there are many veterans who have proved their worth in past seasons and 
at present everything looks favorable for a successful season. 

The infield will be one of the strong fortes of the team. "Ray" Glass 
and "Ty" Youngen are expected to do the best hurling ever this spring. 
There will be several capable men for the first sack, among whom are 
Peterka and Hallihan, Byrne, Miller, and Morris, veterans from last year 
are expected to show up well at second, short and third. Freeley, Trach- 
sel, Hall and others are expected to show up well. 

The outer garden contestants will probably be Colville, Haines, Fran- 
ces, and others. 

Tennis 1926 

Tennis as an inter-collegiate sport at Kent State is in its infancy. A 
team composed of Clark Line, Chas Dunn, and Herman Chapman, trav- 
eled to Cleveland but were rather unsuccessful in carrying away the 
trophies. 

This year Director Frank Oktavec has introduced the novel game of 
paddle tennis into the school. This game not only serves as a pleasant 
indoor sport but will be a great help in developing material for the spring 
team. 



Soccer 1926 



Soccer or Association Football as it is sometimes called, is one of the 
oldest of outdoor sports. It is well authenticated that both the Greeks and 
Romans played a game which has much in common with the modern game. 
Soccer football has been one of the great sports of "Merrie England." For 
some reason this sport has taken only a slight hold in the United States. 
Interscholastic and Intercollegiate is commonly played only in the states 
of the Atlantic seaboard. Eastern Pennsylvania and New Jersey take 
great interest in this game. 

The National Collegiate Athletic Association for several years past 
has been trying to arouse interest in the game and a large number of 
colleges are being made to firmly establish the game. 

The Department of Physical Education has for some time been try- 
ing to promote this vigorous outdoor sport. This fall it was included in 
the required Physical Education program and proved very popular. It is 
the desire of the department to promote the sport as a part of the program 
and it is hoped that within a short time both interest and skill will develop 
which will make it a natural and logical step to form a varsity team for 
intercollegiate competition. 

Page one hundred twenty-eight 





Marie Hyde Apple 

MARIE Hyde Apple is a graduate of 
the Wisconsin State Normal School 
of Physical Education, was instructor 
of physical training in the city schools 
of La Crosse, Wis., and later physical direc- 
tor in the State Normal School at Oshkosh, 
Wis. She came to Kent State in 1918 as 
physical director of women. 

In the past years her work has been diffi- 
cult due to the lack of space and equipment 
in the old gymnasium. This year, with all 
the advantages of the new Wills Gymnasium, 
her work takes all of her time and effort. 
She has charge of the training-school classes 
in physical training, practice teachers in 
physical education, and the college physical 
training classes for girls, besides instruc- 
tion for the girls who are specializing in 
physical education. 

As she herself is fond of athletic activities, 
she is an enthusiastic participator in bowl- 
ing, tennis, baseball, and especially the 
events offered on Faculty Women's gym 
night. 

Her friends are countless, and due to her 
pleasing personality and kindly manners 
she is held in esteem by all. 



Page one hundred twenty-nine 




Evelyn LonK 



Henrietta Strayer 



Vera Jackson 



Elizabeth Boyd 






T 



ennis 



LAST Spring when the first call was given for tennis, many girls came 
forth armed with their "rackets." Some were veterans and eager 
for rivalry, while others had dreams of some day being able to de- 
feat Helen Wills Such an interest was shown that soon two courts were 
not enough to accommodate everyone. 

A tournament was played during the latter part of May. Results 
were much in favor of the Physical Education department. Henrietta 
Strayer and Evelyn Long, winners of the "doubles," and Vera Jackson 
winner of the "singles." "Jack" showed unusual skill in placing the balls 
and her endurance during the entire tournament was remarkable. "Hank" 
and "Ev" played a fast and exciting game, winning by a narrow margin. 

This year a new sport has been introduced at the college, namely that 
of Paddle Tennis. At first, being new and strange, it lacked participants 
but now it is played with enthusiasm by many. 



Page one hundred thirty 




Top Row : Donaldson, Taylor, Grove, Camp, Wells, Muter, Elgin, 
Lane. Drew, Beechy, Quinlan, Monegan. 



Bottom Row : Tar, Scroggie. 



Freshman Basketball Squad 



i HE Freshmen, who are majoring in Physical Education, have been 
given instructions for both playing and coaching basketball by girls' 
rules, under the direction of Mr. Oktavec. 

As it is so essential for the physical development of the girl to play 
basketball only by girls' rules, the referees and coaches must be firm be- 
lievers of such. It has been proven that the game can be as fast and as 
skillful, as when played by boys' rules. 




Page one hundred thirty-one 




Top Row : Sanders, H. Blake, Steinmetz, Felt, F. Blake. Bottom Row : Elliman, Long, 
Bachman, Jackson, Stine, Lane. 



Sophomore Soccer 



NEVER will these girls forget the mornings when fighting and breath- 
less they would at last kick a goal ! Although soccer is a rough game 
and similar to Rugby, the girls proved that they were as good at it 
as the boys. Many a girl has felt the real meaning of "sock-her," but con- 
sidered it a part of the game. 

Soccer for girls is comparatively new in this part of the country and 
only in recent years has it been taken up by the colleges. Although tried 
as an experiment it has met with great success, and promises to become 
a major sport. 

This year the activity is open only to Sophomores, but in coming 
years it is most probable that it will become an intramural sport the same 
as basketball. 



Page one hundred thirty-two 








Tup Row : Vine. Zever, Bradshaw. Bottom Row : Jackson, Stine (capt. ) , Lane. 



Macaronis 



THE Macaronis are certainly good basketball players, and we don't 
mean Spaghetti ! They are the pride and joy of the Musketeers. The 
pep, spirit, and fight displayed by these veterans, outclass, in this re- 
spect, the swarthy Buccaneers. 

They too have never smelled defeat, and each night finds them duti- 
fully practicing for the final skirmish. "As practice makes perfect," they 
expect to give the Blockheads such a crushing defeat, as will subdue them 
for all time. 



Par/c one hundred thirty-three 




Top Row: Birkbeck (capt.), Reed, Blake. Bottom Row: Camp, Blalock, Carr. 



Blockheads 



'his notorious gang is as yet unconquered ! To them is given the honor 
of having one of the fastest and snappiest teams ever playing at 
Kent State. 

The team work of Strayer and Blalock is inconceivable and truly 
make one's hair raise to witness such accurate shots, made from all angles 
on the floor. 

Since to them "To win is to live," may Good Luck be their referee in 
their final struggle with the Macaronis for supremacy. 



Page one hundred thirty-four 








H. Blake 

of the 

Honorable Musketeers 



H. Strayer 

of the 

DistiriKuished Buccaneers 



Musketeers 



NEVER will Kent Staters forget the first outstanding fracas between 
the Buccaneers and Musketeers, when one morning in assembly 
Hank Strayer as a swash-buckling Buccaneer, came tearing down 
the aisle, hotly pursued by Helen Blake, a high-hat Musketeer. Words! 
The clash of swords ! Then the appearance of Mr. Oktavec who, as a 
"buffer," pursuaded them to delay their combat until their followers could 
join them. 

Every girl of the college is either a Honorable Musketeer or a Distin- 
guished Buccaneer. 

Such was the bloodless beginning of a noble order, founded by Mr. 
Oktavec, to stimulate interest in girls' athletics. Although it is in its 
infancy, it shows promise of great growth. However it needs encourage- 
ment from the student body ; a more active participation on the part of 
its members, and greater enthusiasm shown by the spectators. 

Two fierce fracases have already been staged, the Musketeers win- 
ning the first ; the Buccaneers the second. To sustain interest at all times, 
basketball games were scheduled, the following teams competing: 



Madcaps 
Marvels 



Mumps 
Macaronis 



Berries 
Bow-Wows 



Bumps 
Blockheads 



We hope that Mr. Oktavec's novel plan of promoting girls' athletics 
will become customary and eventually a tradition at Kent State College. 

Page One hundred thirty-fire 













Ethel McMasters 



Henrietta Stray er 



Agnes Quinlan 



ct 



Our Cheer Leaders" 



HOW did Kent State win her first football victory this year? Truly, 
the team and coach are to be congratulated, but what of the spirit 
of the students? The pep and enthusiasm displayed at our "pep 
rallies" and later at the games have convinced everyone that our cheer- 
leaders have aroused in Kent Staters a spirit that rightfully belongs to 
college activities. 

However Kent State has a long ways to go before such a spirit is 
found in all students, instead of a few, and in all activities instead of one 
or two games. 



Page one hundred thirty-six 







Page one hundred thirty-Seven 




&mm\\imwn$ 




(^ $rcLt*rxt\tic$ 















Delta Phi Sigma 



Prof. C. F. Rumold Prof. C. E. Satterfield 

President Harold Polen 

Vice-President Earl Weikle 

Secretary Robert Hall 

Treasurer Frank Hall 



MEMBERS 



Lawson McCardel 
Clark Line 
Eugene Barry 
Elden Youngen 
Richard Davis 
Ellis Betzer 
Clarence Gerren 
Kenneth Nash 
Sherman Crow 



Ivan Statler 
Paul Cranz 
Merrill Fuller 
Harlan Carson 
Ralph Spangler 
Craig Nickle 
Harvey Gifford 
Harold Dunlavy 
Travis Bailey 



Virgil Shilling 
Raymond Trachsel 
Donald Baker 



PLEDGES 



Gerald Sellman 
Harold Dunlavy 
Travis Bailey 



ONE of the most successful social events in the history of fraternal 
organizations on the campus of Kent State College was enjoyed by 
the Delta Phi Sigma Fraternity and their guests Saturday evening, 
March 27, at the University Club in Akron. The attractive dancing par- 
lor blending with the times of syncopating orchestra enlightened this for- 
mal evening among all the members and alumni. Characteristic talks 
were excellently given by Professors Van Deusen, Rumold and several 
other members of the Delta Phi. Pleasant memories of this event will 
ever be in the thoughts of the Delta Phi Sigma Fraternity of K. S. C. 

Delta Phi Sigma is a concentration of the ideals expressed in the 
three Greek words Daidouchoumen, Philokaloumen, Selagoumen. Each 
word is a lamp that leads the way to some scholarly attainment. Together 
they represent all that is finest in scholarship. The good, the beautiful, 
the true, these are the things that we cherish for ourselves and for our 
Alma Mater in our college career. We are torch bearers, we cultivate 
the fine arts, and we enlighten. Scholarship, social life and leadership are 
our watchwords. Whatever needs doing to impress these is our work. To 
this work our service in college is dedicated. 

Page one hundred forty 







Page one hundred forty-one 









Gamma Tau Delta 

ALPHA CHAPTER 

Founded 1925 

Prof. Emmett C. Stopher, Advisor 



OFFICERS 

President Willis R. Root 

Vice-President Clifford W. Cunningham 

Recorder and Treasurer Albert C. Heritage 

Howard Jennings 
Board of Governors... ■ Walter A. Jantz 

Chester Davis 



MEMBERS 



Melvin McDermott 
Arthur Gaffga 
Karl Muster 
Chas. F. Spangler 
Earnest Tabler 
Archie Davis 
Willis R. Root 
Albert C. Heritage 
Chester Davis 
Walter A. Jantz 



E. Earl Sulteen 

Claude Graber 

Roy Merril 

Kenneth Carpenter 

Ward W. Davis 

Clyde Vair 

Clifford W. Cunningham 

Howard Jennings 

Clyde Piatt 

Roy Johnson 






Page one hundred forty-two 




— 



- ™" 







Page one hundred forty-three 
















Kappa Mu Kappa 



THE warm spirit of good-fellowship which pervades the quaint and 
picturesque fraternity house at the peak of Summit Street found its 

origin in the founding of Kappa Mu Kappa. 

It is the oldest and first fraternity to be organized at Kent State 
College. Its founders are : David Beckwith, John Harvey Crow, Everlin 
B. Dille, Pasqual Carlozzi, Fred Zappolo, Willard C. Bryan, and Howard 
Evans. 

Its present membership includes : Ben R. Colville, Ben Schroeder, 
Glen Francis, Marion Wolcott, John Schiely, Kenneth Cook, Howard 
Evans, Eugene Feeley, Clifford Morris, August Peterka, William Harvey, 
J. C. Spinnewebber, Charles Arnold, Paul Burgett, Claude Vair, Donald 
Menough, William Halahan, Herbert Woodworth, Frank Curtiss, Norton 
McDermott, Raymond Gooch, C. H. Roushe, H. P. Frank, Alex Cowan, 
Fred Zappolo, Everlin B. Dille, Leslie P. Hardy, Henry C. Robson, Theo- 
dore Huge, Lucien C. Black, Gale Sheets, Paul Packard, Edward Evans, 
Howard Shepard, Paul Levering, Albert Tischendorf, David Beckwith, 
John H. Crow, John Swartz, John Herrick, Ralph Rogers, John Shedden, 
and Ralph Crosby. 

Kappa Mu Kappa is the only fraternity at Kent to have a house for 
its members. Eugene Feeley is 1926 president, Clifford Morris, vice- 
president, Ben Colville, secretary. 

Page one hundred forty-four 




Puye one hundred forty-five 







Masonic Fraternity 

Organized 1925 

OFFICERS 

President : Philip E. Baikd 

Vice-President Ivan R. Statler 

Secretary-Treasurer _-_ Willis R. Root 



FACULTY MEMBERS 



David Olson 
Emmet C. Stopher 
Merle Wagoner 
F. N. Harsh 



L. A. BuDahn 
Lawrence W. Miller 
S. A. Harbourt 



STUDENT MEMBERS 



Ernest A. Tabler 
Harvey J. Gifford 
J. W. Hall 
Earl Miller 
Burgett E. Yeo 



Claude Graber 
Irwin A. Voltz 
Ivan R. Statler 
Philip E. Baird 
Willis R. Root 



Page one hundred forty-six 




■■HHBBHBMi 




Page un< hundred forty-seven 



Alpha Sigma Alpha 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



Mildred Poto 
Margaret Stage 
Ruth Felt 
Helen Murphy 
Rosalind Hathaway 
Jeannette Geiger 



Elizabeth Kist 
Naomi Johnson 
Henrietta Beechy 
Jean Gorham 
Alice Young 
Virginia Skelly 



Ethel McMaster 
Katheryn Greene 
Mary Hopkins 
Margaret Hughes 



ALUMNAE 



Ruth Winters 
Marie Lengs 
Margaret Davis 
Margarite Cundron 



SOCIAL events of this very successful year at Kent, fall under two divi- 
sions for the Alpha Sigma Alpha Sorority, namely the Phi Lambda 

Tau and the Omicron Omicron Chapter of the Alpha Sigma Alpha 
national sorority. 

The Phi Lambda Tau gave an autumn party — in which pledges and 
active members were delightfully entei'tained by a bridge at our presi- 
dent, Miss Hazel Keener's home, in Kent. The Christmas Dance, which 
was held at the Franklin Hotel, lent color and gaiety to the winter season. 

Since Phi Lambda Tau has become the Omicron Omicron Chapter of 
the Alpha Sigma Alpha sorority eventful things are happening in the 
social calendar of the organization. 

Friday evening, February 5, a dinner was held at the Franklin Ho- 
tel. Miss Grace Fultz, national treasurer of the Alpha Sigma Alpha, Miss 
Blanche Verder, Dean of Women, Miss Ada Hyatt, faculty advisor of the 
sorority, and Mrs. Stopher, patroness were guests of the sorority. The 
dining room was decorated in sorority colors and roses. After the dinner 
a business meeting was held at the home of Miss Hazel Keener, Miss Fultz 
pledged the sorority Saturday. 

The spring season ushers in a delightful time for Alpha Sigma Alpha. 
A spring dance is being planned. Preparations are being made for the 
installation of Omicron Omicron Chapter into Alpha Sigma Alpha na- 
tional sorority. National officers of the Alpha Sigma Alpha Sorority are 
to be entertained by the Omicron Omicron Chapter at Kent. The installa- 
tion banquet will be held on April 10. A breakfast will be given on April 
11 at the Franklin Hotel. This will close the week-end program for the 
big event of the year for Omicron Omicron Chapter of Alpha Sigma Al- 
pha, the installation period. 



Page one hundred forty-eight 




Alpha Sigma Alpha 

President Hazel Keener 

Vice-President HILDA BACHMAN 

Treasurer MERIAM Seese 

Secretary LOUISE Brownell 



Pane one hundred forty-nine 













Inter-Sorority Formal Dance 

TAU Chapter of Delta Sigma Epsilon Sorority, formerly Alpha Kappa 
Phi, gave an inter-sorority formal dance, Saturday, February thir- 
teenth, in the Music Room of Moulton Hall. The seven sororities on 
the campus of Kent State were invited. 

The Music Room was beautifully decorated in cream and green. Six 
trellises with various colors interwoven, signifying the other sororities, 
blended harmoniously with the colors of Delta Sigma Epsilon. 

During intermission little Miss Statler gave a delightful dancing 
feature. 

The Formal was opened by a Grand March, at which time the pro- 
grams, in the form of small leather-bound check books, were received 
from the Paying Teller of the Delta Sigma Epsilon Bank, Inc. 

Guests of honor included : Miss Blanche Verder, Mrs. Verder, Miss 
Bess Rider, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Oktavec, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Donaghey, 
Miss Chloe Todd, Miss Geraldine Izant, Mrs. Edith Coe White, Miss Mittie 
Smith, Miss Mona Fletcher, Mr. and Mrs. Stopher and Miss Shamel. 

Various members of the faculty complimented D. S. E. for giving the 
first formal dance ever held on the campus of Kent State. Miss Verder, 
especially, congratulated Tau Chapter in giving, so early in their career 
as a National Sorority, so successful a social event. 

The unusually good music and the artistic decorations caused a ball- 
room atmosphere to pervade throughout the entire evening. Even the 
faculty had an exceptionally good time-proof that the formal was a suc- 
cess. 



Page one hundred fifty 











Page one hundred fifty-one 



Gamma Sigma Phi Sorority 

IN November, 1925, the seventh sorority was organized at Kent. This 
sorority is the Gamma Sigma Phi. The charter members are Thelma 
Young, president, Elizabeth Benyon, vice-president, Violet Thornquist, 
recording secretary, Jane Mason, corresponding secretary, Agnes Black, 
treasurer, Evelyn Williams, Helen Crooks, and Martha Wells. We all 
know that they were very fortunate in choosing Miss Ann Maud Shamel 
as faculty adviser. 

In January we had our first rushing party. A very pleasant after- 
noon was spent in playing Bridge and Five Hundred, after which a deli- 
cious lunch was served. We had as our guest Mrs. White, matron of 
Moulton Hall. 

February twenty-seventh is a day which will long be remembered 
by all the girls of the sorority, particularly the pledges. It was on this 
day that five pledges became sorority sisters of the charter members. They 
were Eleanor O'Malley, Esther Farrelly, Anne Chalk, Mary Dickson, and 
Virginia Smith. Initiation was held in Science Hall on Saturday after- 
noon. That evening the members entertained with a sumptuous chicken 
dinner at the Franklin Hotel. The table was very attractively decorated 
in the sorority colors, green and white. Favors were white gardenia but- 
toniers. Miss Thelma Young, president, gave a brief talk about the 
sorority, after which Miss Shamel, faculty adviser, gave a short im- 
promptu speech. Following this, the sorority sisters all gave short im- 
promptu speeches. We were all very delighted to have with us Mrs. 
Shamel, our adviser's mother. 

At present we have four pledges, Agnes O'Horo, Bernice Warner, 
Florence Gunderson and Melva Moore. 

Despite the fact that this sorority is very young, those who have be- 
come acquainted with it wish and hope for a very successful future. 



Page one hundred fifty-two 




Gamma Sigma Phi 



President 
Vice-President 
Recording Secretary 
Corresponding Secretary 
Treasurer 
Faculty Advisor 



OFFICERS 

Thelma Young 
Elizabeth Beynon 
Violet Thornquist 
Jane Mason 
Agnes Black 
Ann Maud Shamel 



Struthers, Ohio 

Girard, Ohio 

Youngstown, Ohio 

Youngstown, Ohio 

Struthers, Ohio 

Kent, Ohio 



CHARTER MEMBERS 

Elizabeth Beynon, Girard, Ohio; Jane Mason, Youngstown, Ohio; 
Agnes Black, Struthers, Ohio ; Helen Crooks, Warren, Ohio ; Evelyn 
Williams, Struthers, Ohio; Violet Thornquist, Youngstown, Ohio; Martha 
Wells, Struthers, Ohio ; Thelma Young, Struthers, Ohio. 

OTHER MEMBERS 

Eleanor O'Malley, Struthers, Ohio; Mary Dickson, Struthers, Ohio; 
Virginia Smith, Rootstown, Ohio ; Esther Farrally, Hubbard, Ohio ; Anne 
Chalk, Youngstown, Ohio. 

PLEDGES 

Bernice Warner, Ravenna, Ohio; Agnes O'Horo, Youngstown, Ohio; 
Melva Moore, East Youngstown, Ohio; Florence Gunderson, East Youngs- 
town, Ohio. 

Motto — "Friendliness" 

Color — Green and White 

Flower — Lily of the Valley 



Page <"»' hundred fifty-three 




From left to right — top row — Fedilia Wallace, Elsie Kasserman, Beatrice Johnstone, Miss E. A. 
Meyer, Faculty Advisor, Dorothy Stewart, Marguerite Filmer, Essie McClellan, Sophronia Allen. 

First row — Harriet E. Myers, Lois Weichel, Mildred Nickerson, Abbie Morse, Jeannette Carnes, May 
Robinson, Marion Carlile, Evelyn Horton. 

Beta Tau Zeta 

THE Beta Tau Zeta sorority has had many interesting social events 
this year. They started the year by giving an athletic party to some 

of their friends to arouse interest in the coming football games. Then 
the girls earned money for the athletic association by helping sell weiner 
sandwiches at the football games. 

One of their most interesting events was a dinner and theater party 
at Akron. This dinner was given at the Portage Hotel from which the 
girls went to the Colonial Theater. Miss Blanche Verder and Mrs. George 
Verder were the guests of honor. Some of the alumnae members also at- 
tended the party. 

One very merry evening was spent in the dining room of Lowrey Hall 
where everyone played cards. 

The most enjoyable affair however was a card party at the home of 
Miss Eleanor Ann Meyer, the faculty advisor of the sorority. Many 
guests were entertained at this party. 

The new members of the sorority are: 

Miss Elsie Kasserman Miss Marguerite Filmer 

Miss Mary Robinson Miss Dorothy Stewart 

Miss Lois Weichel Miss Fecliah Wallace 

Miss Essie McClellen 
The officers for the year are : 

President Miss Beatrice Johnson 

Secretary and Treasurer Miss Marion Carlile 

Sergeant-at-arms Miss Abbie Morse 



Page one hundred fifty -four 





Back row, left to right — -Elizabeth Switky, Treasurer, Leana Samuel, Emily Rosen, Lillian Hurwitz, 
Rebecca Vinitsky, Hannah Rabinowitz, Hannah Kanter, Secretary. 

Front row — Ruth Kahan, Beatrice Giber, Mrs. Grace BuDahn, Faculty Advisor, Naomi D. Bell, 
President ; Grace Davidow. 



Phi Epsilon Sorority 

PARDON me! Did you say Phi Epsilon?" Who— what— when ? Phi 
Epsilon Sorority is growing better and better every year. Ever since 

its origin this group of girls, small but powerful, became very active. 
Many interesting and enjoyable events have taken place this year among 
the Phi Epsilon sisters, one of which was a bridge party given in Moulton 
Hall, which proved to be a gala event. 

After having tread a steep, perilous and thorny path the pledges, 
Grace Davidow, Beatrice Giber, Emily Rosen, and Ruth Kahan, were ini- 
tiated. 

"What came next?" "Why a banquet?" "What for?" For the wel- 
coming of the new sisters into our sisterhood that capped the climax of 
the week-end of initiation. 

Mrs. Louis Bu Dahn was welcomed into the sorority as our faculty 
advisor. In her honor a beautifully appointed social tea was given at 
Moulton Hall. 

The presiding officers of the sorority are : 

President - Naomi Bell 

Secretary Hannah Kanter 

Treasurer Elizabeth Switky 

Publicity Manager Lillian Hurivitz 






Page one hundred fifty-five 



Epsilon Theta 



EARLY in the spring of 1924, the sorority was organized at Kent State 
College. This sorority, one of the first to be recognized on the Cam- 
pus, was called Epsilon Theta. It had for its president Katherine 
Irwin, a girl of high scholarship and unusual ability. The Epsilon Theta 
had for its charter members such efficient and capable girls as Isabelle 
Collins, Helen Shattuck, Mary Ulmer, Nedra Smith, and Alice Chambers. 

Among the first pledges to this sorority were Mary Louise Dunn, 
Mildred Johnston, Catherine Clevenger, Wilma Pratt, Naomi Burke, and 
Sarah Henricle. 

The new members who were initiated into Epsilon Theta in January, 
1926, were Betty Pille, Ruth Sweeney, Doris Iddings, Helen Hippie, and 
Hazel Cook. 

The new pledges for this year are Katherine Orell, Esther Keay, Lu- 
cille Ewing, Kathleen Fisher, Ethel Frischknet, and Irma Bate. 

The social events on the calendar of Epsilon Theta for the year were 
many and varied. "A get acquainted" party was given at Moulton Hall 
by the old members for the pledges. Entertainment was furnished by 
dancing, games, and cards and the party was followed by a delightful pic- 
nic supper. The pledges not to be outdone, entertained the active mem- 
bers by a Thanksgiving dinner at Moulton Hall. A Christmas party was 
the next important event on the calendar. Then came the formal initia- 
tion of the pledges and in honor of the new members of Epsilon Theta a 
most delightful luncheon was given at the Portage Hotel in Akron. Miss 
Blanche A. Verder, Miss Isabel Hazen, sponsor of the sorority and five 
former members were honored guests at the luncehon. Afterwards the 
members of the sorority attended a theatre party. Late in February came 
a hike and a barbecue picnic. 

Festivities for the winter quarter closed with a formal tea given in 
the reception rooms of Moulton Hall, March sixteenth, at which twenty 
guests were entertained among whom were Dean Blanche Verder, Mrs. 
Verder, Mrs. Edith Coe White, and Miss Hazen. 

Epsilon Theta was pledged to the National Educational Sorority, 
Theta Sigma Upsilon, April, 1926< 

As a whole this has been a very successful year for Epsilon Theta 
and it is hoped that a bright and prosperous future is in store for the 
organization. 



Page one hundred sixty 




Top row — Katherine Orel], Esther Keay, Ethel Frisehknet, Kathleen Fisher, Miss Isabelle Hazen, 
Lucille Ewing. Irma Bate, Helen Hippie. 

Sit tins — Doris Iddings, Wilma Pratt. Catherine Clevenjcer, Mary Louise Dunn, Hazel Cook, Ruth 
Sweeny, Betty Pille. 



Epsilon Theta 

(Pledged Theta Sigma Upsilon April, 1926) 

The officers of Epsilon Theta for this year are : Catherine Clevenger, 
president ; Mary Louise Dunn, secretary ; Betty Pille and Ruth Sweeney, 
social chairmen. 



Page One hundred sixty-one 



Phi Theta Upsilon 



A 



NEW sorority has been organized at Kent College — the Phi Theta 
Upsilon — a sorority of high standards and ideals, with the most 
promising outlook for success and achievement. 

The organization considers itself very fortunate to have Miss Nina 
Humphrey as their Faculty Advisor. 



Election of officers resulted as follows : 

President Vera May Harrington, Akron, Ohio 

Vice-President = Mina Robson, Elyria, Ohio 

Recording Secretary . Jessie Mae Green, Cadiz, Ohio 

Corresponding Secretary Clara Eaton, East Palestine, Ohio 

Treasurer Marguerite Kienle, Chicago, Illinois 

Committee Chairman Louise Haag, Mansfield, Ohio 

Sergeant-at-Arms Jessie Peoples, Mt. Gilead, Ohio 

Chaplain Myrtie Maneely, Youngstown, Ohio 



Charter members are : Vera Harrington, Mina Robson, Louise Haag, 
Clara Eaton, Jessie Peoples, Jessie Mae Green, Myrtie Maneely, and Mar- 
guerite Kienle. 

Spirited and interesting meetings have been held and most pleasant 
social affairs are being planned for the future. 

Among Phi Theta Upsilon's most enjoyable social affairs during the 
spring term has been an informal tea on April 25th at the home of Miss 
Nina Humphrey in Cuyahoga Falls. 

On the evening of April 30th, the Off Campus Women's Club Room 
was the scene of a reception and party for the members of the Phi Theta 
Upsilon Sorority and their friends. Several guests from out of town 
were present, among them being Miss Myrtie Maneely of Youngstown 
and Miss Agnes Donaldson of Bedford. 

Among the coming events are a theatre party and dinner in Akron. 
The theatre party will be at Keith's Albee Palace. 



Page one hundred sixty-two 




Sigma Sigma Sigma 

Motto— "Faithful Until Death" 
Flower — Purple Violet. 






Past 
Faye B. Wolfe 
Arrita Drew 
Violet Creps 
Alice Elgin 
Betty Leickheim 
Mona Fletcher 



Present 

President , Helen Blake 

Vice-President Alice Elgin 

Corresponding Secretary Violet Creps 

Recording Secretary Ferne Strawn 

Treasurer _: Pauline Gaston 

Advisor , ._._ Mona Fletcher 



ACTIVES 



Faye B. Wolfe 
Arrita Drew 
Betty Leickheim 
Ella Springer 
Mae Williams 
Katherine Frase 



Lucille Pearce 
Frances Boettler 
Florence Babb 
Ardis Burroughs 
Laura Fleming 
Migonne Bryant 





isiancne inompso 
Louise Fenton 
Betty Truscott 
Edith Heard 


n 

PLEDGES 


marion iviorsoacn 
Ruth Gieb 
Louis Kestle 
Helen Thorp 






Marion L. Fisher 


ALUMNAE 


Betty Miller 






Alice Dixon 
Elaine Drew 
Mildred Elgin 
Flora Jacobs 
Gladys Jacobs 
Mildred Jones 




Kathryn Mercer 
Vera Morris 
Mildred Mozena 
Katherine Robinson 
Ruth Shiebly 




Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority, the first national at Kent State College, 
was installed on the campus November 7, 1925. Its aims are three-fold — 
first to establish among the members a perpetual bond of friendship; 
second, to develop in them strong womanly character, and third to im- 
press them with the vast opportunities of the teaching profession. 




Page 


one hundred sixty-four 











m*MMzw-& 



Page 0)iv lui itdrbd' idixtgtyi '\p.»'\ 




T 



Local Pan-Hellenic Association 

Founded 1926 

HE Kent State local Pan-Hellenic Association has had a helpful in- 
fluence upon the members of the Association as well as upon the mem- 
bers of the sororities they represent. 

"All for one and one for all," is their adopted slogan. 



OFFICERS 

President Faye Wolfe 

Secretary Henrietta Luth 

Treasurer ...Hazel Keener 

MEMBERS 



Sigma Sigma Sigma 

Faye Wolfe 
Vera Morris 
Helen Blake 

Alpha Sigma Alpha 

Hazel Keener 
Hilda Bachman 
Margaret Stage 

Delta Sigma Epsilon 

Henrietta Luth 
Dorothea Harris 
Thelma Davis 
Bess Ryder 

Gamma 



Phi Epsilon 

Naomi Bell 
Beatrice Giber 
Rebecca Vinitsky 

Beta Tau Zeta 

Fedlia Wallace 
Abbie Morris 
Dorothy Stuart 

Epsilon Theta 

Betty Pille 

Mary Louise Dunn 



Thelma Young 
Evelyn Williams 
Eleanor O'Mally 



Page One hundred sixty-six 









er (Drgaxinnt 


















Off Campus Women's Club 

THE women students of Kent State who do not live in either of the 
dormitories are eligible to membership in the Off Campus Women's 

Club. This group is known for its hospitality to new girl students, 
and its companionship among all of its members. 

At an election held Tuesday, October 13th, the following people" were 
elected : President, Katherine Dietrich, Vice-President, Elizabeth Trus- 
cott, Secretary, Lucy Stadler, and Treasurer, Faye Wolfe. 

The first big social event of this term was the Hallowe'en party which 
was held Friday evening, October 22. The hall was elaborately decorated 
for the occasion. During the evening, cider and doughnuts were served. 
Everyone pronounced the party a success. The "Pop Entertainment" was 
a great success in more ways than one. It brought us before the eyes of 
the town and college as a club that was worth helping, and it also brought 
us practical remuneration for furnishing our club room. 

The following people were elected as officers for the winter term: 
President, Pauline Gaston, Vice-President, Jane Gibson, Secretary, Fran- 
ces Boettler, and Treasurer, Faye Wolfe. 

During that quarter the attention of the club was centered on the 
improvement of the club-room in Science Hall. Miss Nixson kindly aided 
the furniture committee in choosing a three-piece set of wicker furniture 
to match the furniture which was bought last year. Also two straight 
chairs of wicker were added. The piano, which was in Merrill Hall, was 
given by the college. This gift has been much appreciated. Mr. Whyte 
did his bit to help the club by having the screens painted and the doors 
lettered. Miss Gaston gave a beautiful mirror to the club. 

As is the custom the club gave a tea to the faculty and new students 
on registration day. Three parties were given in the winter term, the 
first a get-acquainted party, the second a valentine and the third a St. 
Patricks party. 

Page one hundred sixty-nine 







Officers for Year 1925-1926 

Burgett Everett Yeo, President. Dennis E. Stuart, Vice-President. 

E. Earl Sulteen, Secretary. Harvey Gifford, Treasurer. 

Minton Blauch, Chairman Mem. Comm. 
Ward Wendell Davis, Chairman Ques. Comm. 
Prof. Edgar Packard, Advisor 



Philip Edward Baird 
May Cone 
Agnes Carson 
Estella Greatckes 
Norma E. Hurlburt 



MEMBERS 
Walter Adolf Jantz 
Howard Jennings 
Donna Dean McBride 
Isabella R. Matley 
Mabel E. Moss 
Jason Murlin 



Lillian Rice 
Hannah Rabinowitz 
Rosalie Sipos 
Burdette Weaver 
John Ziegler 



The Blue and Gold Debating Club was organized, originally, October 
24, 1921, in room No. 14, Science Hall, with Mr. Yeo as President. 



Page one hundred seventy 










Blue and Gold Debating Club 






Page one hundred seventy-one 









^ 










Ivan R. Statler, Editor 



Helen D. Hahn, Business Manager 



Chestnut Burr Staff 



Violet Creps, Literary 
Florence Babb, Literary 
Donna McBride, Art 
Molly Pavlic, Art 
Alice Young, Organizations 



Dorothy Tredway, Society 
Richard Davis, Photography 
Gerald Haines, Typist 
Willis Root, Secretary 
Ernest Tabler, Salesman 
Virginia Skelly, Organizations Clifford Cunningham, Jokes 
Clifford Morris, Athletics Harold Hulme, Photography 

Frances Blake, Athletics Hazel Bowman, Publicity Man. 

Katherine Frase, Society Ardis Burroughs, Advertising Man. 

Francis Jacob, Salesman 



Page one hundred seventy-two 




Page one hundred seventy-three 




Page one hundred seventy-four 






i 












a? ratt^frtfMryf, •Jf^Pf^^P r'JW*" 



The Searchlight 



K«.t. i*u.. rh.rw#r. r«b. ». i»» 



SEARCHLIGHT BEANS ON KENT STATE! 



1 *FMiS FAttE-I -i~\KB^ OW KENT STATERS 
I Ti> KEVT " 



"<• mint-* skw WBBKU to br 
SEPTEMBER OKOAS i«-k »TVDKHT 

BXPKiasio.v 

r Trin !*»» anntmncM i 

k ■-iwTbiI W^w* »m M°«-> *htn tfce lifhu 











*;«£&» x*s 



?*i*ir*?9ws' 



I'age One hundred aevetlty-fiv( 






The Social Science Society 

ANOTHER new venture has been started at Kent State College — that 
of maintaining a Social Science Society ! Thinking that such a So- 
ciety would be beneficial to those students at Kent State who take a 
vital interest in their chosen profession, and who will strive to make the 
community in which they will live as teachers a better community, a group 
of active Kent Staters formed a club, whose object was to foster interest 
in problems of social science. The meeting was held on December 3, 1925. 
Later a Constitution was drawn up, which stated that "it shall be the ob- 
ject of this club to foster interest in problems of social science as they 
affect general social conditions throughout the nation ; to the end that 
the society as a unit and its members as individuals may be enabled, 
through a practical and accurate knowledge of social conditions, to exert 
an effective influence for their improvement. It shall be the endeavors of 
this Society to gain this objective by four methods: 

(1) Through increasing our general knowledge of political, social and 
general economic institutions now established by means of reports and 
discussions of members at the regular meetings of the club. (2) By se- 
curing the service of prominent public men as speakers. (3) By prac- 
tical investigation and reports on social conditions and problems. (4) By 
establishing, in due time, a number of subsidiary organizations in com- 
munities of northeastern Ohio, having kindred objects and interests. These 
subsidiary organizations, through cooperation with each other and the 
parent body, would extend the influence and effectiveness of the Society, 
increase the scope of its investigation and informational activities, and 
provide congenial meeting places for socially minded members of vari- 
ous clubs." 

The membership has been open to all who are interested in social sci- 
ence work. Many live topics have been discussed, such as law enforce- 
ment, rural and urban influences on modern American politics, physical 
efficiency, municipal beautification, and juvenile court. Special speakers 
have been Judge Robinson of Ravenna, Dr. DeWeese, and Prof. Olson. 

President Mr. Ben Shroeder 

Vice-President Mr. Raymond Trachsel 

Secretary-Treasurer ..Miss Mae Williams 

Committee Chairmen — 

Constitution and Bij-Laivs __ Miss Faye Wolfe 

Program Miss Florence Babb 

Entertainment .__ , Miss Helen Hahn 

Our factulty advisors have been Prof. Byrne and Miss Meyer. 
We hope that our efforts have not been in vain. We believe that 
our college needs such a society, to help us become better citizens and more 
able teachers. Let us not forget that one of our duties as a member of our 
profession is to so influence life around us as to make this world of ours a 
better place in which to live. By so doing we will fulfil one of our great- 
est aims. What better thing could we strive for? 

Page one hundred seventy-six 










I'at/v one hundred seventy-seven 



Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 

President Lucile Pearce 

Vice-President ..ANNA WELLS 

Secretary Violet Creps 

Treasurer Marion Carlile 

Undergraduate Representative Miriam Seese 

CHAIRMEN COMMITTEES 

Hike and Outdoor .... Violet Thornquist 

Hospitality NELLIE CLOSE 

Music Abbie Morse 

Social Glenna Stine 

Program, Edith Heard 

PUBLICITY 

Lowry Hall Molly Pavlic 

Moulion Hall Elizabeth Beynon 

History of the Y. W. C. A. 

WITH the coming of spring, one begins to look back over the work 
which he has done to measure to some degree his success. In turn- 
ing back the leaves of time for the Y. W. C. A., we find many things 
to its credit with the additional word success. 

The Y. W. C. A. has proved to the college that it is an active organi- 
zation by having hikes, outdoor breakfasts, and various other social func- 
tions. At Hallowe'en, a party was given at the Children's Home in Ra- 
venna. The children enjoyed it so much, that next year they were prom- 
ised another. Not only at our own college, but also in the mountains of 
Kentucky, the Y. W. C. A. at Kent State College is known. At Christmas 
several boxes were packed by the girls, who so willingly gave their time 
to the dressing of twenty-five dolls, and so unselfishly donated articles of 
clothing no longer wanted, that some child might be made happy. 

The annual bazaar of the Y. W. C. A. was attended by more people 
than ever before. 

The musical talent of this organization was displayed at Christmas, 
when the members with lighted candles went to the homes of the faculty 
singing the beautiful Christmas carols. 

In the social and recreational life of the Y. W. C. A. the members show 
the same creativeness. The Colonial Ball was a huge success, with prac- 
tically every person in costume. Many times was the comment heard, "I 
am having the best time !" This probably more than all else is the crite- 
rion for the success of an affair. 

Now to close this most successful year, the Y. W. C. A. showed its 
wisdom and again elected Lucille Pearce to be president. To work with 
her we find Dixie Wales, vice-president, Beatrice Johnstone, secretary, 
and Anna Wells, treasurer, and Marion Fisher, undergraduate representa- 
tive. 

With this splendid staff of officers, who have taken the initiative in 
many other new undertakings, we are left with the prospect of a bright 
future. Who can tell what the next step of the Y. W. C. A. will be? 

Page one hundred seventy-eight 




The Y. M. C. A. 



THE Y. M. C. A. virtually a new organization in the school, experi- 
enced rather a progressive year. Every institution and project has 

its obstacles and discouragements, but the Y. M. C. A. has weathered 
all of these. 

It has been the desire of the members, cabinet, and the "Y" as a 
whole to serve the men students on the campus who have entered school 
for the first time, help them to secure rooms and other difficulties that a 
new man always has. 

The "Y" is not a separate organization of the school like a fraternity, 
but it is an organization for all men on the campus. We sincerely hope 
that we can help you and you help us to make the activities of the associa- 
tion a big success from now on. 

The organization has for its cabinet the following members: E. 
Earl Sulteen, president; Arthur Gaffga, vice-president; Kenneth Carpen- 
ter, secretary ; Walter Augustine, treasurer, and D. W. Pearce, faculty 
adviser. Mr. Pearce is one of the most popular teachers on the campus 
and is able to sponsor for the association. 



100 r 'r ORGANIZATIONS 

Three organizations have demonstrated their loyalty to the Chestnut 
Burr by selling annuals to 100^ of their membership. 

They are the 

Delta Sigma Epsilon 
Gamma Tau Delta 

and 

Phi Theta Upsilon 

sorority. 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE SUMMER QUARTER 






Isabella Collins 
Mabel E. Reed 
Bess Wickert 
Avarilla Webster 
Gertrude E. Monroe 
C. T. Monroe 
Lester R. McDonnell 
Mrs. Mary Salman Bolton 
M. Rodenberger 
V. Beckwith 
Sarah E. Hamilton 
Lillian Russell 



Mary E. Lake 
Kenneth McClintock 
Dora Simmuka 
Olive M. Gossett 
Susan B. Garberson 
J. L. White 
Marie B. Wilke 
A. M. Holland 
Garth A. Thomas 
Paul E. Spacht 
Alma Lang 



Page one hundred eighty 




MEN'S UNION 



Page one hundred eighty-one 




??C2TIPX2TIC5 








Sociaf £<*icmSft r 















CALENDAR of EVENTS 






OCTOBER 



MONDAY 


TUESDAY 


WEDNESDAY 


THURSDAY 


FRIPAY 


SATURDAY 








1 


2 


3 


Registra- 


Registrat'on of 


Marine Band 


Faculty Wom- 


All College 


Y. W. C. A. 


tion former 


new students. 


Concert in Au- 


en's Club Re- 


dance in charge 


Hike to Beck- 


students. 


Dean of Wom- 


ditorum. 


ception to new 


of faculty so- 


with Cottage. 


Dean of wom- 


en's G e t-Ac- 


Y. W. C. A. 


members. Moul- 


cial committee, 




en meets wom- 


quainted Party 


Supper in Col- 


ton Hall. 


Moulton Hall. 




en students at 


at Moulton 


lege Wood. 








Moulton Hall. 


Hall. 










5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 




Dr. Brown at 


Opening night. 


Big Sister Tea 


Elks Home 


Faculty Wom- 




assembly. 


Faculty in 


Dance by Wom- 


Coming Dance, 


en's Club Sup- 






gym. 


en's League. 


College Gym. 


per in Gym. 






Y. W. C. A. 


Moulton Hall. 










meeting in 


15 










Moulton Hall. 


"Pep" Assem- 










Leader. Miss 


bly. 










Verde r. 








12 


13 


14 


22 


16 


17 


Joint House 




Y. W. C. A. 


Beta, Beta. Be- 


College Swing 


Hiram-K e n t 


Meeting Moui- 




Science Hall 


ta Tea Dance. 


Out and Col- 


Game, Rock- 


ton Hall. 




Report of Del- 


Moulton Hall. 


lege Fire. 


well Field. 


Epsilon Theta 




egates to Sum- 






Beta, Beta Be- 


Sorority Party 










ta Dinner 


Moulton Hall. 




ence. 






Dance, FYank- 
lin Hotel. 


19 


20 


21 




23 


24 




Y. M. C. A. 


R e c o g n i- 




Off Campus 


H i p h School 




Meeting Sci- 


tion Service Y. 




Women's Club 


1 n i t i a- 




ence Hall. 


W. C. A. Moul- 




Party, Moulton 


tion Dance at 






ton Hall. 




Hall. 


Moulton Hall. 
Team at Edin- 
boro. Pa. 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 




F'.rst Brthday 


Y. W. C. A. 


Olin Tone Test 


N. E. O. T. A. 






Party College 


Hallowe'en 


Concert. Audi- 


C o n v e n- 






Dining Room. 


Party at De- 


torium. 


tion, Cleveland. 






P h i Epsilon 


tention Home, 


Alpha Kappa 


Kent State 






Tea Dance at 


Ravenna. 


Phi Hallowe'en 


Luncheon. Hol- 






Moulton Hall. 




Party, Stewart 
Lake Pavillion. 


lenden Hotel. 





Page one hundred eighty-four 




CALENDAR of EVENTS 



NOVEMBER 



MONDAY 


TUESDAY 


WEDNESDAY 


THURSDAY 


FRIDAY 


SATURDAY 


9 


3 


4 


5 


6 


? 




Y. M. C. A. 


Y. W. C. A. 


Mr. Bott in 


Beta Tau Zeta 


Team at In- 




Meeting in Sci- 


Moulton Hall. 


Assembly. 


gave an Infor- 


diana, Pa. 




ence Hall. 






mal Party at 
Lowry Hall. 
Tri Beta So- 
rority Becomes 
National. 


Mrs. B o u rn e 
and Miss Nix- 
on entertain at 
Moulton Hall. 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


Joint House 


Recital at As- 


Holiday after 


Faculty Wom- 




All College 


Meeting at 


sembly, Andre 


12 o'clock noon. 


an's Club Meet- 




Dance under 


Moulton Hall. 


Ribaupiere. 


Armistice Day 


ing Dinner at 




the direction of 


Mr. Packard, 




American Le- 


Franklin Hotel. 




the Faculty So- 


speaker. 




gion Dance, 
Wills Gym. 






cial Committee 
at Wills Gym. 
Game with W. 
Liberty at Kent 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 




Y. M. C. A. 


Parent-Teacher- 


Victor Record 




Game at Kent 




Meeting in Sci- 


ers* Association 


Contest in As- 




with Findlav 




ence Hall. 


School in ses- 
sion in even- 
ing. 

Y. W. C. A. 
Thanks- 
giving Service, 
Moulton Hall. 


sembly. 

Lowry Hall 
Girls Give a 
"Kid" Party. 




College. 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


Re-organization 


Treble Clef at 


College Closes 






High School 


of Blue and 


Assembly. 








Alumni Asso- 


Gold Debating 


Tri Sigma 








ciation Dance 


Club. 


Party. 








in Gym. 



Page one hun&red eighty-fids 







CALENDAR of EVENTS 



DECEMBER 



MONDAY 


TUESDAY 


WEDNESDAY 


THURSDAY 


FRIDAY 


Saturday. 


7 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


Joint House 


Princess W a- 


Y. W. C. A. 


Second Birth- 






Meeting Moul- 


tawaso at As- 


Moulton Hall. 


day Party at 






ton Hall. 


sembly. 


Packing of 
Christmas Box- 
es for Children 
in Caney Creek. 


College Dining 
Room. 






14 


S 


9 


10 


11 


12 




o. c. w. c. 


Y. W. C. A. 


Junior Chorus 


Faculty Wom- 


Moulton Hall 




"Pop" Enter- 


Bazaar, Moul- 


at Assembly. 


en's Club. 


House Party. 




tain at Audito- 


ton Hall. 




X m\a s Party, 






rium. 






Moulton Hall. 






15 


16 


17 


18 


19 




Epsilon Theta 


Y. W. C. A. 


"Childe Jesus" 


College closes 






Pledge Party at 


and Y. M. C. 


present- 








Moulton. 


A. Carol Sing- 
ing. 


ed at Assembly. 
Phi Epsilon 
Bridge Party, 
Moulton Hall. 
High School 
Xmas Party. 
















Page one hundred eighty-six 



CALENDAR of EVENTS 



JANUARY 



MONDAY 


TUESDAY 


WEDNESDAY 


THURSDAY 


FRIDAY 


SATURDAY 


4 


5 


6 




1 
8 


9 


R e g i s t r a- 


Term Begins at 




Off Campus 


New Year Ball 


Sophomore Hi 


tion Day. 


8:00 A. M. 




Women's Club 


given by Wom- 


School Party. 


Rotary Club 






Gave a "Get- 


en's League at 




Concert Recep- 






Acquaint- 


Moulton Hall. 




tion and Dance 






ed Party in 






for Club at 






its Club Rooms. 






Moulton Hall. 












11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 




New Fraternity 




W o m e n's 




Davey Dance 




Announces its 




League Tea 




in Will's Gym- 




Being. Chooses 




Dance at Moul- 




nasium. 




Gamma T a u 




ton Hall. 








Delta a s its 












Cognomen. 










18 


19 


20 


21 


22 
Kappa M u 
Kappa House 
Party. 

Davey Dance in 
Gym. 

Delta Phi Sig 
ma Initiation. 


23 
Sigma Sigma 
Sigma Sorority 
Dance in Kent 
Hall. 


25 


26 


27 


28 
Fashion Show 
by Mrs. Bishop 
of Lindner Co. 
of Cleveland. 


29 
Federation o f 
Kent Women's 
Clubs and Fac- 
ulty Club in 
L o w r y Hall 
Dining Room. 


30 



Piu/r one hundred eighty-seven 



IL 







CALENDAR of EVENTS 






FEBRUARY 



MONDAY 


TUESDAY 


WEDNESDAY 


THURSDAY 


FRIDAY 


SATURDAY 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 




Phi Epsilon 


Y. W. C. A. 


A 1 p-,h a Beta 


Junior Class of 


Alpha Beta 




Tea in home 


program at 


Sigma Card 


Junior College 


Sigma Card 




of Mrs. Bu- 


Portage Co. In- 


Benefit at 


Dance at Moul- 


Benefit at 




Dahn. 


firmary, R a- 
venna. 


Moulton Hall. 


ton. 

Phi Lambda 

T a u Sorority 

Dinner at the 

Franklin. 


Moulton Hall. 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


Gamma T a u 


Gamma Sigma 


Minstrel show 


Faculty Wom- 


Delta Phi Sig- 


Delta Sigma 


Delta Smoker 


Phi Card Par- 


given by K. of 


en's Club. 


ma Card Party 


Epsilon Formal 


at Chamber of 


ty at Moulton. 


P. in audito- 


Raphael Em- 


at W. W. Hall's, 


Installation. 


Commerce. 




rium. 


manuel of 


Ravenna. 


Dance in Moul- 






Y. W. C. A. 


ChaJdea A d- 


Kent State De- 


ton Hall. 






Tri S i g m a s* 


dressed the As- 


feated Slippery 


D a v e y School 






guests at a 


sembly. 


Rock, Pa. 


Dance in Gym. 






"Castie" party. 


Valentine Par- 
ty given by O. 
C. W. C. 






15 


16 


17 


IS 


19 


20 




Mid-Term Big 




W i t t e n- 


Colonial Dance 


Kappa M u 




Sister Tea in 




burg Glee Club 


given by Y. W. 


Kappa Party 




Moulton. 




in Auditorium. 


C. A. at Moul- 
ton. 

Kent State 
Played Edin- 
burg Normal. 


at their Frat. 
House. 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


Washing- 








Kent State De- 


Benefit Dance 


ton's Birthday. 








feated Findiay. 


in Gym. 



Page one hundred eighty-eight 




CALENDAR of EVENTS 






MARCH 



MONDAY 


TUESDAY 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 








Third Birthday 


Bowling Green 










Party in Col- 


defeated Kent 










lege Dining 


State. 










Room. 












Debating Club. 












Davey Dance. 












Concert given 












by Mr. Drietz 












in Assembly. 






8 


y 


10 


11 


12 


13 




Buccaneer Meet 


"The Whole 


Benefit for K. 


Delta Sigma 


Moulton Hall 




in Gym. 


Town's Talk- 


M. K. Frat. 


Epsilon Bridge 


House Party. 




Y. W. C. A. 


ing, given by 


"American Ve- 








Y. M. C. A. 


the Dramatic 


nus" in Opera 


and Mis. Don- 






social Science 


Club. 


House. 








Club Meeting. 




Senior College 


Kent State 






Dr. DeW e e s e 




Freshman Par- 








speaker. 




ty in 0. C. W. 
C. Room. 


boro State 

Normal. 




15 


16 
"Lady of Sha- 
lott" given in 
Assembly b v 
Treble Clef. 
St. Patricks 
Day Party by 

o. c. w. c. 

Lowry Hall 
House Party in 
Lowry. Phi 
Epsilon Dinner 
in Franklin. 


17 


IS 
Lloyd C. Doud- 
las in Chapel. 
Faculty Wom- 
en's Club. 
Term Ends. 


19 


20 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 






Installation of 


"Rip Van 




Delta Phi Sig- 






Y. W. C. A. 


Winkle" given 




ma Dinner 






Officers. 


by High School 
Glee Club in As- 
sembly. 




Dance at the 
University Club, 
Akron. 








Gamma Sigma 














Phi Indoor pic- 
















nic in 0. C W. 
















C. Room. 










2il 


30 


31 












Joint House 


Big Sister Tea 


Y. W. C. A. 












Meeting. Lowry 


for Little Sis- 


Meeting in Au- 












Hall Play. 


ters. Moulton 
Hall. 


ditorium. 













Page one hundred eighty-nine 



CALENDAR of EVENTS 



APRIL 






i 






MONDAY 


TUESDAY 


WEDNESDAY 


THURSDAY 


FRIDAY 


SATURDAY 


5 


6 


7 




1 


2 


3 


College o p e ns 


Address by 


Y. W. C. 


A 


College closes 






at noon 


Captain Noel 


Meeting 


in 


for Easter va- 








"Mt. Everest" 


Moulton H 


all. 


cation. 








In Auditorium. 


Piro f. Miller 


Brown Union 










speaker. 




Glee Club in 
Auditorium. 
Dance in Moul- 
ton Hall. 






12 


13 


14 




8 


9 


10 




Off Campus 


Y. W. C. 


A. 






Alpha Sigma 




Women's Club 


Meeting. 








Alpha banquet 




give benefit 


Y. M. C. 


A. 






and installation 




play in Audito- 


Meeting. 








services 




rium. 










at F r a n kl i n 
Hotel. 


19 


20 


21 




15 


16 


17 


Moulton Hall 


Senior High 


Y. W. C. 


A. 


Kinder- 


North Eastern 




Play. 


School Class 


Meeting. 




garten Exhibi- 


Ohio Orator- 






Play in Audi- 


Y. M. C. 


A. 


tion in Assem- 


ical Contest in 






torium. 


Meeting. 




bly. 


Auditorium. 


Franklin Hotel. 




Breaking 














ground for new 














Training 














School. 












26 


27 


28 




22 


23 


24 




Rotary and Ki- 


Y. W. C. 


A. 


Bishop Rogers 


Sigma Sigma 






wanis Dinner 


Wetting. 




in Assembly. 


Sigma Tea for 






in Lowry Hall. 


Y. M. C. 

Metting. 


A. 


29 
Mr. Edmund 

Secrwist gives 
Arbor Day pro- 
gram, under 
W o m e n's 
League. 

Beta Tau Zeta 
Rushing Party. 


Mrs. Winters at 
Moulton Hall. 

30 
Men's Union 
Dance in Moul- 
ton Hall. 
May Day 
Breakfast for 
Off Campus 
Women's Club. 


Club. 



Page one hundred ninety 




Calendar of Events 
May — June 



" May 6— Y. W. C. A. Benefit Movie at Opera House. 

May 7 — All College Dance. 

May 8 — Lowry Hall Party. 

May 9 — Mothers Day. College girls entertain their mothers. In 
morning — go to church. Dinner in Lowry Hall Dining Room with music 
and program following. 3 :30 — 4 :30, all buildings on campus open for 
inspection. 4:30 — 6:00, tea served in Moulton Hall. Sororities plan en- 
tertainment for evening. 

May 14 — Home Coming. Registration in morning. In afternoon, 
athletic events in Wills Gymnasium and Rockwell field. In evening, play 
"The New Poor" in Auditorium. 

May 15 — Home Coming. In morning, registration. Luncheon in 
Lowry Hall Dining Room. In afternoon, athletic events in Rockwell Field. 
Off Campus Women's Club dinner at Franklin Hotel. In evening, dance 
in Wills Gym. Campus organizations will entertain retruning alumni at 
social functions arranged for the dinner hours Friday and Saturday. 

May 20 — Campus Night. 

May 21 — Junior-Senior High School Reception Moulton Hall. 

June 1 — Faculty reception to Senior Classes. 

June 3 — Miss Margaret Page Olmstead piano recital at Assembly. 

June 10 — Class Day Exercises. 

June 11 — Commencement. 






Page one hundred ninety-one 







Treble Clef Club 






THE Treble Clef Club, which was organized in 1925, has grown con- 
siderably since last year. The club now consists of forty members. 
At Christmas time the girls presented "Childe Jesus," by Clokey, 
assisted by the Men's Glee Club and Mr. Coffeen of Kent. Later they pre- 
sented "The Lady of Shalott," by Bendall at one of the assembly programs, 
with Mrs. Geo. Hinds as soloist. The club is now practising "Barbara 
Friet'chie," by Jordan, which will be given as part of the program for 
Decoration Day. 

The Treble Clef was originally the idea of Miss Shamel. She was 
not only the founder of the club, but also has been its leader throughout 
all its activities. The success of the club is due to her influence and 
personality. 



Page one hundred ninety-three 




Abbey, Osborne 
Bailey, Travis 
Baird, Philip E. 
Baker, Donald 
Blauch, Minton E. 
Bohecker, Robert 
Butler, Kenneth 
Crow, Sherman L. 
Cunningham, Clifford 
Davis, Archie 



Dunlavy, Harold 
Gaffga, Arthur 
Gifford, Harvey J. 
Gooch, Raymond 
Haines, Gerald 
Jantz, Walter A. 
Merrell, Roy 
Miller, Clarence 
Murlin, Jason 



Russell, LeRoy 
Sander, Karl W. 
Schwartz, Abe 
Senyder, Mitchell 
Shilling, Virgil 
Stewart, Dennis E. 
Statler, Ivan R. 
Trachsel, Raymond 
Weaver, Burdette 
Ziegler, John H. 



Men's Glee Club 

FOR the first time in the history of the college a Glee Club for men 
has been organized and has promise of a real live glee club. 

The men have not had the opportunity for music expression be- 
cause of the conflict of hours and no requirement in Music in the four- 
year course. 



Page one hundred ninety-four 






Junior Group 




Pauline Gaston 


Ruth A. Knecht 


Mae Irene Nelson 


Jean I. Gorham 


Hazel Keener 


Helen M. Porter 


Dorothy M. Grimm 


Marguerite Lynn 


Jean Rothwell 


Dorothy R. Hall 


Marion MacLellan 


Helen M. Seidel 


Dorothea Harris 


Lenore Mueller 
Senior Group 


Esther Mae Venner 


Mary E. Bennig 


Frances Eging 


College Group 


Mignon J. Bryant 


Abbie M. Morse 




Catherine Clevenger 


Loretta Ryan 


Mrs. Frank Matley 


Louise Crandall 


Ernestine Stoll 


Mrs. Verna Proehl 


Pearl Warner 


E. Mae Williams 





Special Music Group 



THE Kent State Special Music department seems to be as exclusively 
feminine as the Home Economics department for although an occa- 
sional male finds his way into Music 11, all those who have ventured 
farther are girls. 

The informal atmosphere of the music classes has made the room 
seem like a "drawing room class." 

The "drawing room" part is confined to the atmosphere for at most 
times it seems that 14 S is the very throne room of the Great God Work. 

I defy anyone to look with scorn upon the study of harmony ; he need 
only go to a Junior Music student to be emphatically corrected. 

The piano work under Miss Sirdefield is most pleasant and through 
the effort of the teacher the girls show marked progress and become ac- 
quainted with the best piano compositions. 

The piano kindergarten work is also profitable as well as interesting. 

The study of orchestral instruments with Mr. Van Sickle is another 
phase of music study that will be of great benefit when we have to con- 
duct our own orchestras. 

Miss Shamel's voice work is an hour which all enjoy. 



Page one hundred ninety-five 




The Orchestra 



THE orchestra at Kent State this year is said to be the best the college 
has had for the last three or four years. 

Miss Shamel directs this organization which meets for practice 
every Wednesday. 

The members with the instruments played follow: 

Miss Sanderson, violin Miss Binning, cello 

Miss Bryant, violin Mr. J. Murlin, cello 

Miss Drew, Violin Miss E. Stoll, piano 

Miss Gorham, violin Mr. R. Merrell, trombone 

Miss Kienle, violin Mr. E. Betzer, clarinet 

Miss Nelson, violin Mr. C. Cunningham, drums 

Miss Wallace, viola Mr. H. Gifford, cornet 






They have played several times for the student body at assemblies 
and were greatly appreciated. 



Page one hundred ninety-six 







A Sea-Storm 

By Irwin A. Voltz 

THE natural things of life are always the most inspiring. Within the 
heart of every human being there lies an instinctive appreciation of 
the moods and manifestations of Nature. To this extent are men 
truly equal, from King to peasant, from President to farmer — there is 
a common understanding and kinship. It is the most pronounced proof 
of the God-Spirit in all of us, for when we are absorbed in the study of 
Nature, which is the visible side of God, our spirits are in true harmony 
and accord with the Infinite. 

Nature was wisely designed to appeal to the varied and sometimes 
rather discriminating temperaments of man. Some of us delight in a 
beautiful sunset ; others in the fascinating moon, and still others in plants 
and flowers or in a view of mountain peaks, valleys, rivers, lakes and for- 
ests. To relatively few, however, is it given to wholeheartedly enjoy the 
exhibition of Nature in her stormy moods. This gift of appreciation, how- 
ever, may be developed, for the lack of it points to the inheritance of fear 
to which our ancestors were subject. 

In the "bright, blue weather" of an October morning, the newly-com- 
missioned battleship, "Tennessee," left the sheltering protection of "Li'l 
01' New York," with her crew of fifteen hundred men and officers. The 
ship was scheduled to make a trial run along the coast of Maine, and most 
of us rookies, who had long looked forward to this experience, were filled 
with eager expectancy. We could not understand the blase' attitude of the 
older "sea-dogs." 

On the second day out, which was Friday, everyone was busily occu- 
pied with the duties of "field-day." "Field-day" in the Navy refers to 
the weekly process of cleaning, scrubbing and preparation for Saturday 
inspection. At four o'clock in the afternoon the bugler sounded the wel- 
come call of "Retreat." As weather conditions indicated a "rough" sea 
for the night, the officer-of-the-day ordered all hatches secured and the 
boat-covers fixed in place. 

All these preparations were welcomed by me, for they presaged the 
fact that old Neptune was planning a little entertainment. Immediately 
after "chow" I slipped on my pea-jacket and slicker in preparation of 
spending a few hours above decks. As I made my way forward I began 
to notice a slight rolling of the vessel. I hurried on, for I felt that in 
order to thoroughly appreciate the coming storm I had to become a part 
of it. Reaching the forecastle deck, I was nearly blown over with the 
force of the rising wind. The deck was wet with the salt spray which 
dashed over the bow at intervals. I walked, slid, and scrambled on all 
fours until I had reached the very "eyes" of the ship. 

The scene here was almost startling in its contrast to the warm, ani- 
mated life I had left but a moment before. One could scarcely realize 
that within a few feet there was a small city of men, except from the 
occasional bits of talk or laughter which emerged from the still-open ports. 

Page one hundred ninety-seven 




But above decks there was no sign of life. It seemed as though I were 
the solitary rider of a monstrous sea-horse who obeyed my every will. A 
half-moon, rendered alternately obscure and visible by swiftly-moving 
masses of dense clouds, permitted an intermittent view of the heaving, 
restless surface of the ocean. Directly overhead I caught glimpses of a 
solitary star and though millions of miles separated us, I felt a close com- 
panionship in its presence. It too, had come forth this night from the 
haunts of its companions to glory in this tumult of the elements. 

Far off to the starboard could be seen the faint lights of scattered 
fishing villages and lighthouses on the coast of Maine. A few points off 
the port bow I could discern the mast light of a slow-moving freighter. 
Except for these, and the traffic lights on the war vessel, there were no 
other evidences to indicate the intrusion of man into this drama of Nature. 

The mild slap-slap of the waves had by this time been converted into 
a tremendous boom. The succeeding onslaughts of the deep increased in 
violence, alternately advancing to attack and receding with suppressed 
gurgles of chagrin, in a monotonous regularity. Though rolling and quiv- 
ering from these shocks, the iron horse plunged unswervingly onward. 

Suddenly the eerie whine of the wind about the masts was broken by 
an ominous silence. Then came lightning, streak after streak, cutting 
jagged paths of fire across the heavens. The ship staggered and shook 
and I was forced to grip the anchor chain by my side to save myself from 
being washed overboard. I was in a world of water — both sea and sky 
seemed determined that I should be aware of their presence. 

The soothing notes of tatoo, sounded by the bugler, now called me 
back to practical things. I had but five minutes in which to go below, 
swing my hammock and turn in for the night. Naval regulations permit 
no infraction of its rules on the flimsy plea of sentiment or communion 
with Nature. With a hasty "Au revoir" to my friend, the Storm, I scram- 
bled down the ladder to the quarter-deck and barely managed to crawl in- 
to my hammock before the master-at-arms came by on the first of his 
nightly rounds. 

Kent State's vista opens wide 
On rolling hills, and forests green 
And growing wealthy countryside ; 
On winding highways seen 
Between spires and chimney towers 
Of the towns and cities, 
Where a wealth of opportunity is ours, 
Kent State must send its teachers there 
With vision that can greet 
Their problems as they come. 
With grace and courage, yet discreet 
In wisdom, as in power gentle still 
Correcting wrong and guarding truth 
Yet spreading love, and hence, good will. 
From our vista may the vision 
Help us fulfill this mission. 

Page one hundred ninety-eight 







Our School Spirit 



THE most common way of hurling brick-bats at our students is to 
charge them with a dearth of school spirit. In fact they will accuse 
one another of lacking this particular school virtue. It is at the close 
of the "pep" meetings that this accusation is oftenest made. 

Surely no one doubts that a spirited yell by a large body of students 
— the right yell at the right time — is very stimulating, but there are other 
ways of expressing school spirit which are quite as effective and much 
more direct. Even in football games, where yells are much emphasized, 
the record which determines the real athletic standing of the school, is not 
made by the yells, but by the work of that muddy, bloody SILENT man 
who carries the ball across the other goal line. Whenever our college is 
in any way jeopardized, the attitude of our alumni and students is better 
exemplified by this self-sacrificing SILENT man than by all the roar of 
all the bleachers. 

Last October I sat with a thousand Kent State banqueters in the 
Hollenden Hotel in Cleveland. Not a single yell was given, though there 
were songs and other exercises. Certainly those privileged to see that 
dignified thousand, everyone bearing on his shoulders some part of the 
educational responsibility of the old Western Reserve, could not accuse 
them of lacking school spirit. I have also attended Kent State banquets in 
various cities where sometimes almost every teacher in the system who 
had been a student at Kent State even for a brief period was present to 
show his spirit. After these students have invested one year, two years, 
three years, or four years of their lives in Kent State they realize that it 
is to their interest to make it the greatest state teachers' college in exist- 
ence. Only then will their investment bring large dividends and be profit- 
able. The greatest school spirit grows out of seeing the glory of alma 
mater and the glory of personal achievement both merged into unity. 

The kind of school spirit we do not have and do not want is the kind 
that takes up the freshman, breaks his bones, and throws him into the 
pond. Every freshman here is met on the first day by a Big Brother or 
a Big Sister on terms of sincere equality. 

That we lack some of the noisy expressions of school spirit is due to 
several causes. One of these is that many of our students, especially dur- 
ing the summer have already been teachers. Their burden of executive 
responsibility has already given them the habit of employing the intellec- 
tual approach to their problems instead of the emotional approach em- 
ployed by those who wait for college yells. Another cause is that for 
every student in attendance here on the hill, there is another student who 
is out teaching in some one of the large centers of Northeastern Ohio. He 
belongs to some college class which once a week meets with some Kent 
State teacher for a recitation. In this way he is getting an education 
which not only helps him with his daily tasks, but also brings him closer 
to his diploma or his degree. And for every student in attendance here 
on the hill there is still another student who is teaching out away from 
these centers, perhaps in the rural school of some isolated lonely valley, 

Page one hundred ninetij-niyie 






Health and Athletics 



THE old saying that "a man is wealthier if he has good health than if 
he has untold wealth" is certainly a true one. Because if one has all 
worldly goods and yet is lacking in this one of the most essential 
things of life, what does one really have after all? 

If one has never had an opportunity for developing good health be- 
fore, the work that one gets in college goes a long way toward that end. 
If one does not take advantage of the opportunities that are offered in 
college and public schools that go for making a better physical conditioh 
it is certainly his own fault if he is not healthy. 

Such activities as archery, swimming, speed-ball, volley-ball, soccer, 
hockey, tennis, scouting, and fencing develop not only the body and all 
its muscles and organs but also a clean and pure sense of good sportsman- 
ship and comradeship. They are invigorating and buoy up one's spirits 
as well as give one a good appetite. Health is a wonderful gift not to be 
tampered with and greater than all the wealth in the world. 

Kent State is endeavoring to fill this need for her students and the 
Physical Education department is trying to build up good health for those 
who do not have it and preserve it in those who are fortunate enough to 
possess it. This can be done by giving the girls activities which thej 
enjoy, and in consequence many new sports are being introduced. It is. 
hoped that in time every girl in the college will have participated in two 
or more sports during the year. 






and who is taking correspondence work conducted by Kent State. He 
spends his long, lonely winter evenings with his book and pen. In this 
way he, too, is getting an education which not only helps him with his 
daily tasks, but also brings him closer to his diploma or his degree. 

When these non-resident, undergraduate students, now teaching in 
the cities, the villages, and the rural districts, who have amid the encircling 
gloom of their difficult task felt the strong hand of Kent State reaching 
down through the Extension Work or the Correspondence Work to lift 
them up to the kindly light, — when these students come to Kent to do 
their necessary resident work and to get their hard earned but gladly- 
earned diplomas or degrees, they may not be able to synchronize perfectly 
in yelling "Rah! Rah! Rah!", but they will have a deeper school spirit 
than any college yell can express. 






Page two hundred 




Demodee or Modern 



G 



OOD-BYE, Hester," said Gilbert softly the evening before his de- 
parture for college, "You are my fair lady, my ideal. Will you marry 
me when I finish?" 

"Oh, you won't care for me when you know college girls." 

"Gee, I don't like their type, from all I've heard about them." 

"But — " and Hester hesitated, for, although she disagreed with what 
Gilbert said, she had been taught that it was unbecoming for a girl not 
to concede her opinion to the men. 

Then, although he longed to kiss her as she stood shyly beside him in 
the moonlight, he remembered that he had expressed an antipathy for 
girls who were romantic (and therefore he must not be), and checked the 
impulse. 

"Guess I'll have to run along now and finish my packing. It's great 
to go ! Wish you could go, too. Well I won't forget you ! Be good ! Good- 
bye, dear Hester. I'll write," and he passed down the moonlit street. 

"Oh, he's gone! I'll miss him so! He has the strongest personality 
of anyone I know. But he dominates me too much to suit me. If he falls 
for some college girl I'll be so mad !" Hester soliloquized to his retreating 
back. 

"Oh, Mother I had a dreadful dream last night!" Hester exclaimed 
to her mother the next morning. "I dreamed that Gilbert came back with 
his degree and we got married. But we weren't happy because he wanted 
to boss me too much and I resolved to rebel. Then I woke up. I'll bet 
he'd think he was lots better than I if I never went to college, too." 

"Dad I got a letter from Gilbert already !" Hester danced delightedly 
into the room waving a letter. "He's crazy about college, but he hasn't 
forgotten me yet. I'm so thrilled!" 

But Hester spoke too soon, for within three or four months Gilbert 
had evidently tired of writing and Hester did not get any more "thrills." 

"Well the Cranes are moving away from Fairlawn!" remarked Mr. 
Thurston one night at dinner. "I suppose Gilbert wrote it to you, Hetty?" 

"We don't correspond any more," Hester admitted in a confused 

voice. 

"That's exactly as it would be, too, if I don't have a college education." 

The next year Gilbert's parents moved from Fairlawn. Hester had 
not seen Gilbert since the night before he left for college. 

"He'll never remember me, I know, when he sees those college girls. 
I'm terribly old-fashioned compared with them. I wonder if they let the 
fellows dominate them as they do here." 

The once-loved village had become very tiresome and boring to Hes- 
ter since Gilbert had gone, and she felt that her life was utterly wasted. 
Her grandfather, who had come to live with her family, noticed her dis- 
content and surprised every one with the declaration that he was going 
to send Hester to college. 

"My old friend Markham is sending his granddaughter to college this 
fall and I told him I'd like to have you go with her." 

"Oh, grandfather, it's just what I've been wanting so much!" 

Page two hundred one 




The summer passed quickly and happily for Hester, and the time 
came for her departure. Her grandfather's friend and his grand-daugh- 
ter, Geraldine, arrived a day early so that the two girls might get ac- 
quainted before they left. Hester felt that Geraldine was her ideal — 
from her bright green hat to her blonde pumps. She noticed the differ- 
ence between their respective appearances and wished that something 
might be done about hers. 

The first days at college were not very happy for Hester. As time 
passed, Geraldine became aware of the contempt that their class-mates 
showed toward Betty, all on account of her demonde appearance. Lov- 
ing Betty as she did, she resolved to help her and kindly broached the sub- 
ject of a beauty parlor. An appointment was made with a few misgivings 
on Betty's part and soon a changed Betty emerged from the shop. The 
simple, old fashioned girl did not look much like the shingle-haired, per- 
manently-waved girl. 

"Now for the clothes !" Geraldine exclaimed as they sauntered toward 
a lovely apparel shop. 

The ensuing weeks were an ecstacy of rapture for Hester who had 
never been accustomed to a great deal of admiration and attention be- 
fore. To the vigilant "Jerry," her very personality was changing — her 
whole nature seemed to expand like a chrysalis which has emerged from 
its shell with the self-confidence and assurance her appearance gave her. 
She had submitted in silence to the decisions of others — now she charm- 
ingly but resolutely gave her opinions. She had been content to follow — 
now she led. She used to sit out dances but — now she had to split them 
among several suitors. 

Her grandfather sent her a two-hundred-dollar-check for Thanksgiv- 
ing, saying he was thankful to have such a lovely grand-daughter. 

"Now I can have a new evening gown for the Junior Prom!" 

One would never recognize the belle of the dance as the diffident Hes- 
ter of Fairlawn. 

During the intermission the president of the Junior class brought 
over a good-looking young man to Betty, Who was the center of a group 
of admiring "sheiks." 

"Betty, may I present Gilbert Crane? Miss Thurston, Mr. Crane. He 
has been wanting to meet you all evening, but you were occupied." 

Betty had discarded her first name and went by her middle name, 
Elizabeth, — and Jerry nick-named her "Betty." 

"Do you have any relatives in Fairlawn?" Gilbert asked as they 
danced away together. "I used to know a family by the surname of 
Thurston." 

Betty made some inaudible answer and Gilbert concluded that she 
did not. 

Before the evening was over, Gilbert decided that she was the most 
fascinating girl he had ever met, and lost no time "dating her up." 

Betty recognized Gilbert the moment he was presented to her, but 
when she saw that her altered appearance prevented his knowing her, she 
resolved to put him to a test and ascertain whether he would "fall" for a 

Page two hundred two 










modern girl, since he had always expressed the greatest contempt for 
one, Wise Betty! 

As the weeks flew by, Gilbert's conclusion became a pleasant reality, 
and he felt that hours were days when he could not see her. 

Who says that there is not a little of Eve in every girl's make up? 
By the end of the year Gilbert was so infatuated that he proposed one en- 
chanting moonlight night in May. 

"You are my fair lady, my ideal, Betty," he declared, as the canoe 
drifted idly. "You are the fulfillment of my dreams." And he kissed her. 

"Score two!" confided Betty aloud to her image in the mirror that 
night. "Oh, the constancy of men !" 

Good-byes had been said and Betty was home in Fairlawn again. 

Meanwhile, Gilbert's actions had rankled in his conscience and he felt 
himself to be a cad in his treatment of "poor Hester," as he now termed 
her in his mind. But when the vision of Betty appeared to him, "poor 
Hester" was completely overshadowed. 

On his return from school the problem of keeping his vows to Hester 
perplexed him so constantly that he decided to visit her and confess every- 
thing, trusting to her liberality in releasing him. Forthwith, he wrote 
and mailed a letter saying he would arrive the following day. 

When she read the contents of the letter, she planned the final scene 
of her little drama. 

"By George! I wish I didn't have to do this!" Gilbert said to him- 
self as he walked down the familiar street. "Hester is such a sweet un- 
suspecting girl that I hate to hurt her. Now if she were more like mod- 
ern girls I wouldn't care. But I can't help it — a man must be master of 
his own fate. She's all right, but lacks the speed of Betty." 

Hot and perspiring, he was ushered in by Hester's grand-father. 
While awaiting her, the loquacious old man entertained him, rambling on 
about his niece Hester. At first Gilbert paid no attention to the speaker, 
as he was inwardly quaking at the explanation that was forthcoming to 
Hester. But a sentence suddenly arrested his attention. 

"What a change a year at college has made in my little shy Hester !" 

This was the first knowledge Gilbert had of Hester's attending col- 
lege, as he had not continued corresponding with her in the last two years. 

Glancing up, he saw a vision in the doorway. 

"Betty!" and enlightenment dawned on Gilbert at last. 

Laughingly Bettey replied, "Which wins — the old-fashioned or the 
modern?" 

Feme Strawn. 



Page two hundred three 







Another Day 



THERE penetrated to my innermost consciousness a sound of disas- 
ter, like the distant rumbling of a coming storm. I buried one ear in 

the pillow and put my fist on the other and slumbered for a while in 
tranquility. But again the disturbance of the elements troubled my sleep, 
I attempted to escape the inevitable by covering myself completely with 
the quilts, but to no avail. The terrific din seemed to be coming up the 
stairway and toward my room. I expected at any time to find the walls 
caved in upon me by the storm, or to look out and confront a monster of 
hideous mien. The waves of oblivion rolled from me gradually; I found 
myself struggling and floundering on the shores of consciousness, and from 
somewhere landward came a voice shouting — "For the last time, I tell you, 
breakfast is served at once and only once." I was suddenly and com- 
pletely awakened. I recognized my landlady's voice. 

A glance into the brutally frank mirror which tops the desk known 
as a dressing table in the vocabulary of my elegant hostess, disclosed quite 
clearly, even to my somewhat biased perception, that I need a shave. A 
subsequent inspection of my Big Ben convinced me that it was an occa- 
sion when such formalities might better be varied. 

At breakfast a variety of things, peculiar to the life of a scholar, 
tended to distract my attention from the bacon and eggs so temptingly 
served by my afore-mentioned benefactor. Due to some unpremeditated 
events of the night before, I had prepared for neither of my morning 
classes. The question of which to study first, on my way to school and 
to class, threw me into deep introspection, until I remembered that it would 
be necessary for me to be absent from my second class, as I had to go to 
Slim's to obtain his dress-suit for the dance that night. It was necessary 
for me to go just at this time for Slim had arranged to have no classes 
'til after noon, and he would just be through with his breakfast and ready 
to receive visitors. To go earlier would be to intrude upon his morning 
repast; later he would be out. So only the one period would suffice for 
my call. Thus it was fortunately settled that I would study for my first 
class, which I would have done had I not discovered that I had neglected 
to bring that particular book home the previous evening. 

Hence I rose from the breakfast table and departed unencumbered, 
for school, feeling a profound and scholastic joy in the beauties of a new 
day. 

By Florence Babb. 



Page two hundred four 














&VTi awcaaristas 









I 


,,,v- 


j . » ^ " 


C&rtvope of 
MNr STAT* reACWIsf*& COLUEOE - 
h««> Otito 


i 









Three Summer Terms 

Courses: For Superintendents and Principals; Teachers in Elemen- 
tary Schools; Teachers in Rural Schools and in all Special Subjects. The 
Kent Demalstration School will offer opportunity for observation and 
practice from the Kindergarten through the Junior and Senior High 
School. 

Lakeside Advantages : Many glacial lakes furnish fine fishing, boat- 
ing, and bathing. The location of the College on the hill top surrounded 
by natural forest trees and near so many lakes explains the delightful 
climate at Kent during the summer months. 



For catalog and information write to 

Kent State Normal College 

Kent, Ohio 



Page two hundred six 




DRUGS CANDY 

"EVERYTHING YOU WOULD EXPECT" 

in a 

MODERN 



DRUG STORE 



at 



HALE B. THOMPSONS 

Registered Pharmacist 



Corner Main and Water Street 
TELEPHONE 15 

COLLEGE BOOKS STATIONERY 

Page two hundred seven 









THE CITY BANK 



KENT, OHIO 

Organized 1881 



ASSETS OVER $1,000,000 
Safety Deposit Boxes for Rent 



4 PER CENT ON TIME DEPOSITS 



OFFICERS 

H. H. Line Chairman of Board 

M. G. Garrison <. President 

D. L. Rockwell Vice President 

E. F. Garrison Secretary-Treasurer 

G. P. Bechtle Assistant-Treasurer 



Page two hundred eight 




Page two hundred nine 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



V. W. SURBER 

FEDERAL OIL & GAS BUILDING 
AKRON, OHIO 



J0 



GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

On Wills Gymnasium 

Addition to Lowry Hall 

New Training School 

New Library 

KENT STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 






Page two hundred ten 







TEST 

First Humorist — "So you try 
your jokes on your wife?" 

Second ditto — "Certainly ; if she 
doesn't laugh I know they're 
good." 

HAPPY ENDING 
"Look here," said the theatrical 

director to the corpse, "why did 

you laugh as you were slain in the 

last act?" 

"Well, with the salary I get, to 

die is a pleasure." 



OUT WITH IT 

Father — "My son, I'm afraid 
that I will never see you in 
heaven." 

Son — "Whatcha been doing 
now, Pop?" 

BEAUTIFUL 

"Sulty"— Is she pretty? 

"Huck" — Say, if that girl would 
go to Italy the leaning tower of 
Pisa would fall for her. 



BREAKING IT EASILY 
Percy — Sorry, old man, that I 

lost your gloves. 

Voice from Bath— That's all 

right I lost your Stetson. 

Percy — Fine! The gloves I lost 

were in the topcoat I borrowed 

from you. 

THE CYNIC 

Wifey — What did the boss say 
when you told him you sat up all 
night with the baby? 

Hubby — The darn fool asked me 
what her name was. 



SWEETNESS 
Young Bride — Sweetheart, the 
grocery stores were closed today, 
but I made you some nice bean 
soup out of some jelly beans I got 
at the confectionery 



"Fine car you have here, Fran- 
cis. What's the most you've got 
out of it?" 

"Nine times in a block." 



Jantz — Where did you get that 
black eye? 

"Art" — You know that lady 
down the street whose husband is 
in China? 

"Art"— Well— he isn't. 



FOR GIRLS ONLY 
How to Reduce — Push away 
from the table three times each 
day. 

"Did that millionaire grand- 
father of yours remember you 
when he made his will?" 

"He must have — he left me 
out." 

SOME BRIGHT REMARKS 
If it's true, darn you, that you 
were better than your boy, it's be- 
cause you had better parents. 



The world gets better. At the 
age when the old-time boy was 
shooting birds, the modern ones 
are chasing chickens. 



Here comes the cynic who says 
that the old-time fiddling was 
merely revived to promote the sale 
of rosin and liniment among rheu- 
matic musicians. 



Proof that civilization is prog- 
ressing: We have the standard 
New Year's Day, the Jewish New 
Year, the Greek and Chinese New 
Year, and although they don't co- 
incide it hasn't yet been the cause 
of war. 

Prince Chichilu of Japan is the 
Wales of his native land. He is 
laid up with injured tendons as 
the result of a fall from a pair of 
skates. 



Page two hundred eleven 




Bark healing perfectly over Davey cement filling. A burr oak 

on the estate of Mrs. Edith Rockefeller McCormick, Lake 

Forest, Illinois. 



NEARLY $2,000,000 

FOR DAVEY TREE 

SURGERY IN 1925 

The Davey Tree Expert Company 
did a volume of business of nearly 
$2,000,000 last year, and the only 
thing they have to sell is personal 
service — the service of highly trained, 
professional Tree Surgeons, whose 
work is mechanically perfect and sci- 
entifically perfect and scientifically ac- 
curate. 

Last year Davey Tree Surgeons 
served 13,086 clients — an average of 
less than $150 per client — from Bos- 
ton to Kansas City, and from Canada 
to the Gulf. There are nearly 700 of 
these master Tree Surgeons, some of 
whom live and work in your vicinity, 
within easy motoring distance of your 
home. They are quickly available and 
no carfare is charged. 

It will cost you nothing to have your 
trees examined by these men who 
know trees and Tree Surgery values. 
You can get an honest, authoritative 
opinion without obligating yourself. 



The Davey Tree Expert Co. 

401 City Bank Building KENT, OHIO 



STEINERS BOOK STORE 



'The Students' Store" 



College Supplies 

Kodak Finishing 
Dennison Goods 
Gifts 



PHONE 445 E. R. STEINER 

Page two hundred twelve 



141 E. MAIN ST. 





,„,<*. r,„i!S5S A CUP OF COFFER SANDWICH, AND YOU 

BE tIEXT YE** 





BEHIND THE FffONT 



A LONG, LONG TRA«U 



^Vn UFO u^" _ABU C -B^ HOU5 £ 



NEVEff AG4/N. 




SKUNK-" Tlir»» T * 

Paffc two hundred thirteen 







GENSEMER BROS. 



WADSWORTH 



KENT, OHIO 

MASSILLON CANTON CRESTON 



RETAILERS OF 

Dry Goods Floor Coverings 

Ladies' and Children's Footwear 

Ladies' Ready-Made Garments 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



FRED ALTERDORF 

Manager 



FRANKLIN HOTEL 
Kent, Ohio 



Page two hundred fourteen 




What Would Happen? If 

Prof. Packard didn't have a story to tell 

Red Wolcott forgot the way to Cleveland 

Prof. Olson didn't give his classes their daily 'bawling out" 

Hulme was seen out on a heavy date 

Ben Schroeder should get to his eight o'clock class on time 

Slim Arnold should get fat. 

Chuck Spangler should get thin 

Lucille and Frances should not see each other for a whole day 

Miss Spencer should not have her lesson 

Sanders could not spout off for five minutes 

Mr. Pearce was sour and out of humor 

Quinny didn't see Billy after each class. 

Prof. Rumold did not get to class on time 

Gene and Bob should not be seen in Science Hall 

Anna Wells forgot how to giggle 

Ralph wouldn't write a note to Mabel during a class 

Weaver couldn't have a date for a week 

McCardel was shy and timid 

Cunningham couldn't sing and play 

Ella was a man hater 

Hazel Keener didn't wear Roy's sweater 

Kay Greene didn't get a letter a day 

Dr. DeWeese didn't say "Wall how are you today?" 

Louise Brownell didn't wear her hat on the back of her head 

Miss Pow couldn't talk in class 

Henie Beechey and Burkey were enemies 

Anyone should see anything funny enough in any of these to make 

them laugh. 



Loafers are not useless. Sign 
painters seem to enjoy an audi- 
ence. 

Fame — A dead man's picture on 
a cigar wrapper. 



A man's idea of being helpful 
around the house is to empty his 
own ash tray when it overflows. 



The reason a kiss meant more in 
the old days was because there was 
no "Take One" sign in the vicin- 
ity. 

POSSIBLY 

"Is your son home from school 
for the holidays?" 

"I think so. One of the ser- 
vants said she thought she saw him 
day before yesterday." 



USELESS TO CALL 

C. Spangler (indignantly) — 
"Bring the proprietor here at 
once ! There's a wasp in my soup." 

Otis — "It's no use sending for 
'im, sir, 'e's deadly scared of 'em 

himself." 

WELL MEANT 

Doc. DeWeese — "How are you 
feeling?" 

Patient — "Pretty well, except 
for my breathing." 

Doc— "Well, I'll see if I can't 
stop that tomorrow." 



A RETORT COURTEOUS 
"Sir," said the studeous young 

lady next to Abbey in the library, 

"you are annoying me." 

"Aw gwan," said Osbourne, 

"I'm not either, I'm a-gnawing 

my candy." 

Page tiro hundred fifteen 



1 


OLIN'S 




QUALITY MUSIC STORE 


Kent National Bank 


Latest Hits in Sheet Music 




Records and Player Rolls 




PIANOS 


e¥¥s 


MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 




AND RADIO 


Checking Accounts Solicited 


135 E. MAIN STREET 


4% Paid On Savings 




Safe Deposit Boxes for Rent 


HOWARD YOUNG 




Bicycles, Sporting Goods 


$mp 


Fishing Tackle 
Auto Accessories 




Tires 


4% and Safety 


Phone 44 143 E. Main St. 




KENT, OHIO 



THE COLLEGE EXCHANGE 

TEXT BOOKS AND SCHOOL SUPPLIES 
For All Departments 



SCHOOL STATIONERY AND JEWELRY 

PENNANTS AND PILLOWS 
PHOTO DEVELOPING AND PRINTING 



PARKER PENS DIAMOND INK 

"Try Us First for Books and Si^plies" 



HOWARD D. EVANS 

Page two hundred sixteen 



BEN J. SCHROEDER 




WATCH ~W^ _ 



THE PAINTf H 
AND HIS BRUSH 



::sd FW AH 8:0/) CLASS . #fcjr 

Pajre two hundred seventeen 




STORE NO. 3 
228 W. MAIN ST. 
RAVENNA. OHIO 



PARADISE 

CANDY KITCHEN 
FANCY SODAS AND SUNDAES 

ALWAYS A DELICIOUS LIGHT LUNCH 
We try to please. 
HOME MADE PIES 

C. H. BUNKER and G. A. PAPPAS, Proprietors 



STORE NO. 2 

134 E. MAIN ST. 

KENT. OHIO 



H. C. Longcoy 

"Good Things To Eat" 

Right Across from the Post Office for a Full Line of 
PICKLES, OLIVES, CAKES, FRUITS, COOKED AND FRESH MEATS 
Or Anything Else in the Line of 

'•GOOD THINGS TO EAT" 

OUR MOTTO 

Service — Quality — Price 




The Gruen Prestige Costs No More. 

The Name on the Watch Dial 

is All-Important— GRUEN 

G. F. ELGIN 

Jeweler and Optometrist 

114 N. Water St. 



KNEIFEL GROCERY CO. 

Richelieu Pure Foods 

142-146 N. Water St. 



Page two hundred eighteen 



Actual - 



Offers complete course in all business 
subjects. 

General Business 

Auditing 

Accounting 

Stenography 

Bookkeeping 

DAY AND NIGHT CLASSES 

Write or telephone for complete in- 
formation. 

ACTUAL BUSINESS COLLEGE 

21 N. Main St. Main 197 

AKRON, OHIO 




Can You Imagine 



Margaret Floyd out on a date. 

Pearl Woodings winning the mile race. 

Agnes Quinlan without a smile. 

"Billy" Cassel trying to gain weight. 

Alice getting enough to eat. 

"Tommy" Springer the Dean of K. S. C. 

Ruth Morledge angry. 

Lois Weichel not relating some past experiences. 

Dorothy Lance with a boyish bob. 

Molly Pavlic tall and fleshy. 

Fern Strawn fat lady of the circus. 

Anna Wells forever solemn. 

Beatrice Johnson small and athletic. 

Marian Carlyle thin and puny. 

Alice Countryman refusing a second helping. 

Gladys Hitchings handling two men. 

Olive Walter in her room before 10:10. 

Harriet Myers swearing. 

Miss Smith with not an O.K. on her room. 

Mabel Moss not singing. 

Gayle Rhinehart without a lesson. 

Faye Slutz without some advice. 

Edythe Whitacre not in love. 

Delia Lyndes bald-headed. 

Gertrude Cain with curls. 

Beulah Ray getting an F. 

Nola Smith not dignified. 

Frances Metts doing an aesthetic dance. 

Helen Porter a grown-up lady. 

Clara Eaton not fulfilling her family name. 

Evelyn Horton refusing a date. 

Vera Mae Harrington doing the Charleston. 

Marjory Black prim and precise. 

Opal Seamen staying over the week-end. 

Lucile Hewing breaking rules. 

Esther Venner loving Library Economy. 

Alice Wire vamping some fellow. 

Olive Weireik ever a weaver. 

Alice Brollier late to class. 

Esther Butzer an opera singer. 

Marie Miller not getting a special. 

Kathryn Oreille with long dresses. 

Esther Farrely dumb. 

Minnie Harder with a loud voice. 

Essie McClellan not rushing the new girl. 

Rose Wexler never campused. 

Mrs. Usher wearing a pink carnation to town. 

Mildred Nickerson dropping a tray. 

Janet Carnes singing Rock-a-bye, Baby. 

Dorothy Hall without her uke. 

Laura Fleming not reciting in Math. 

Esther Kaey with a school-girl complexion. 

Nellie Walker a joke editor. 



Page tiro hundred nineteen 




DONAGHY'S 



THE 



Friendly Drug Store 




A drug store founded and operated on the somewhat 

unusual and unique principle that Friendship 

is paramount to financial gain. 



WHERE YOU WILL FIND 



Text Books, Student Supplies, Sheaffer Lifetime Pens, Domestic and Imported 
Toiletries, Stationery, Delicious Luncheon and Soda, Kodaks, Films and Fin- 
ishing,— and friendly, interested sales people. 



Business University 

57 E. Market Street 

Akron, Ohio 

Get Your Business Training at 

THE HAMMEL 

New classes formed first and 
third Mondays of each month. 

Page two hundred twenty 



ciKRON 

LAW 

SCHOOL 

57 E. Market Street 
Akron, Ohio 

Offers a Four- Year Course 
Preparing for 

BAR EXAMINATION 
C. A. Neale, Secretary 












Rollins Armour Plate Hosiery 




"Miles of Wear in Every Pair" 


HAHN'S BAKERY 

116 North Water St. 


W. R. ZINGLER CO. 


Fine Baked Goods 

Special Orders Given Prompt 
Attention 


STORE OF ECONOMY 

Dry Goods - Notions 

General Merchandise 
and Ladies' Furnishings 

Kent, Ohio 


MILK 


Service — Efficiency — Courtesy 


CREAM 

ICE CREAM 


S. C. BISSLER C& SON 




Complete Home Furnishers 


THE PERFECTION 


Funeral Directors 


DAIRY CO. 


Corner W. Main and River Sts. 


Phone 341 Kent, 0. 


Kent, Ohio 
Phone 530 


THE KENT COURIER 

Lawson and Arthurs, 


READ STUDIO 


Proprietors 

138 E. Main Street 

Courier Building 

Kent, 0. 


Yes, we made the pictures and 
we have your negatives on 
file. Any time you wish prints 
from them, we can make them 


Phone 26 


for you on short notice. 




See the enlargements from 




these films, they are 








certainly fine. 




- ^— 




We Specialize on 




#P& 




Kodak Work 




* X A 




129 E. MAIN STREET 








KENT, OHIO 



Page two hundred twenty -one 







This Annual is a 
Ward & Shaw Product 



Our special annual service — 
Our co-operation with the 
different annual boards — 
Our attention to details — 
Suggestions, etc. — 
Delivery on specified date — 



These are some of the reasons why we 

print more school annuals than 

anyone in this part of 

the country 



The WARD & SHAW Co. 

Printers of 1926 Kent State Annual 
1 00- .' 06 St. Clair Ave., West Cleveland, Ohio 









Page two hundred twenty-three